The Scientific Revolution

The Scientific Revolution questioned and ultimately challenged conceptions and beliefs about the nature of the external world and reality that had crystallized into a strict orthodoxy by the Later Middle Ages. This intellectual movement taught Europeans to view the universe and their place in it in a new way. Thus the Scientific Revolution, popularized in the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, stands as the major force in the transition to the largely secular, rational, and materialistic perspective. In one sense, the Scientific was not a revolution. Rather it changed Europe gradually and in a piecemeal fashion.

Important Works of the Scientific Revolution

1543
1543
1609 - 1619
1610
1628
1632
1668
1687

Consequences of the Scientific Revolution: Important Works

1620
1637
1640
1650
1669
1677