Deaf History/Events 1800-1849

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Alice Cogswell

1805

Alice Cogswell, who would later spark the beginning of the creation of Deaf Education, is born.

Alice Cogswell's sickness

1807

Alice loses her hearing and later her speech due to "spotted fever."

Alice meets Gallaudet

1814

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet becomes neighbors with Alice. He is determined to teach her how to communicate. With some success, he helped Alice learn some language, but he didn't know the best strategies to educate a Deaf child.

Gallaudet travels to Europe

1815

Gallaudet travels to Europe in hopes to learn more about their methods of Deaf education.

Return to America

1816

While in Europe, Gallaudet meets Laurent Clerc who agrees to return to America with him in hopes of opening the first American school for the Deaf.

American School for the Deaf

1817

Gallaudet and Clerc return to America and open the first Deaf school in America in Hartford, Connecticut, originally called American Asylum for Deaf-Mutes. Alice was the first person to enroll in this historical school.

New York

1818

The New York Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb is founded.

Pennsylvania

1820

The Pennsylvania School for the Deaf is founded.

Kentucky

1823

The first school supported by the state, Kentucky School for the Deaf is opened.

Alice Cogswell's death

1830

Alice dies at the age of 25.

Missouri

1837

The first Catholic school for the Deaf is opened in St. Louis, Missouri, St. Joseph's.

In St. Louis, Missouri, St. Joseph's the first Catholic school for the deaf, opens.

Virginia

1839

The Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind opens. It is the first school to integrate deaf and blind students.

Higher Education for Deaf

1847

The idea of a higher education for the Deaf is propsed by American Annals of the Deaf.

18th Century

The 18th Century was known as the Enlightenment Era. Philosophers including, Locke, Rousseau, and Condillac, debated the nature of language, the origin of language and thought, and signs.