George Washington's Presidency

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French Revolution

1789

One of the first acts in the French Revolution was when citizens in Paris captured the Bastille. The citizens overthrew their king and made a republican government. Many Americans thought that France was making the same democracy as the United States, so they supported them. King Louis XVI was beheaded by revolutionists in January of 1793.
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The French Question

1793

Edmond Genet, a French representative, asked American sailors to command privateers to help the French fight the British. Washington denied the opportunity because it was against The Neutrality Proclamation. Jefferson was pro-France while Hamilton was pro- England. Jefferson resigned his title as the Secretary of State because he felt that Hamilton interfered with his role.
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The Nuetrality Proclamation

1793

The United States was not allowed to take sides with European countries that were at war because of the Neutrality Proclamation. Many disagreed with Washington. Even James Madison thought that Washington did not have the authority to do so.
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General Wayne Takes Command

1794

Washington gave General Anthony Wayne the command of the army in the West. His troops built Fort Greenville and additional forts. In 1794, the supply train near the fort was attacked, and his troops responded, burning Native American crops and towns. The British stopped aiding the Native Americans, and the leader, Little Turtle, made his people seek peace.
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The Whiskey Rebellion

1794

Whiskey became a currency because money was rare. Many farmers argued that they could not afford the tax and that they should keep the money that they made from the product. Farmers did not like the tax on Whiskey and fighting broke out, which stated the Whiskey Rebellion. Washington, tired of being inactive, led the army against the rebellion. Most rebellions fled when they arrived.
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The End of Conflict

August 20, 1794 - August 1795

The Battle of Fallen Timers occurred August 20, 1794 between Wayne's troops and the Native Americans. Native American leaders signed the Treaty of Greenville in 1795. It let United States claim most Indian lands in the Northwest Territory.
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Jay's Treaty

November 1794

Washington sent Chief Justice John Jay to work out a compromise with the British because the U.S. lacked a strong navy and the trade highly involved around British participation. Both sides signed Jay's Treaty in November 1794. Citizens were angry at this treaty. Washington didn't agree with this treaty, but he thought that it was all that could be done.
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Pinckney's Treaty

October 1795

Washington sent Pinckney to meet with Spanish minister Manuel de Gody, who agreed to Pinckney's Treaty. Spain agreed to acknowledge the U.S.'s southern boundary.
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