Historical Fiction Tessa W.

Fever

The beginning

August 1, 1793 - October 21, 1793

A girl who gets sent into the country because her mother doesn’t want her to get yellow fever. Yellow fever is a nasty disease that spreads very quickly. It is from misquotes.

Polly Dies

August 16, 1793 - August 17, 1793

Matilda lives with her mom, grandfather, sister, and maid. There has been yellow fever going around. Polly her best friend, just died from it. Matilda is so very sad.

Matilda Stays in Bed

August 24, 1793 - September 1, 1793

Matilda has a sister named Polly. She also has a mother and her mother believes she has a sleeping disease because she never gets up when she calls her.

Grandfather's Rules

September 1, 1793 - September 2, 1793

Matilda’s grandfather came up with all these rules for yellow fever and she didn’t want to hear it because her friend died of yellow fever. Matilda started to get tears in her eyes and wanted to leave but she didn’t want to die herself so she stayed in the house.

Food Troubles

October 1, 1793 - October 30, 1793

Everybody kept going on about yellow fever. The people say they found a cure but they say none of them are available, but then it came a ship load of sick people came. It was just to dangerous for anybody to be around anybody except their family. They are having trouble getting food because Matilda’s family was to scared that they would get yellow fever they just didn’t want to risk it buying it from the store.

Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever

1648 - 1975

Yellow Fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease. This disease may be mild to severe. Some symptoms include fever, nausea, vomiting, headache, abdominal and muscle pains. More severe symptoms include hepatitis.

Philadelphia

October 1793 - November 1793

In Philadelphia of 1793 5,000 people died out of 45,000 population, of yellow fever.

Yellow Fever During Civil War

1878 - 1879

There were comparatively few cases of yellow fever during the Civil War. Peacetime brought a boom of trade as improved rail service and shipping allowed people and goods -- as well as disease, to travel easily in the united nation. By 1878, conditions were ripe for a powerful epidemic of yellow fever in the Mississippi Valley.