Alternate History (WWI)

Central Powers Win

Divergent Timeline

This is the Alternate Timeline.

Divergence

September 5, 1914

This is where the world begins to diverge from history.

Schlacht an der Marne

September 5, 1914 - September 9, 1914

The Battle of the Marne. Instead of being halted and then retreating the Imperial German Armies, now numbering nearly 1.2 Million strong march against the BEF and French forces totaling 1.1

The battle lasts for nearly four days before finally coming out with the German Forces on top.

With the French and BEF armies now beaten in an incredibly decisive battle, the BEF withdrawal from France, who then subsequently offers up truce terms with Germany rather than see fighting in and around Paris.

Schlacht von Paris

September 10, 1914 - October 17, 1914

Battle of Paris.

Following the German Victory at the Battle of the Marne, the Imperial Forces numbering just over 1 Million strong continue the advance on Paris, facing meager resistance from the French and BEF armies. Once in the actual outskirts of the French capital the resistance collapses as the French Government accepts terms from Germany.

Niederlande Kampagne

October 20, 1914 - December 2, 1914

The Low Countries Campaign:

Following the surrender of France after the prolonged Battle of Paris, German forces regroup and renew offensives in the Low Countries nations primarily Belgium and the Netherlands. This is an attempt to subsequently force them to surrender.

This results in the Antwerp Treaty (November 27th) and the Hague Treaty (December 1).

Treaty of Paris

October 29, 1914

Withdraws France from World War I. Defeated and Humiliated most of its colonial lands are lost.

France cedes possessions in North Africa to the Ottoman Empire, sub-Saharan possessions are given to the German Empire. As do their possessions in the Pacific. Those in the America's however are to be ceded to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. France also recognizes German claims to Alsace-Lorraine forever renouncing their right to those lands.

The Treaty of Paris is signed on October 29th of 1914 ending French Involvement in the war.

The British Expeditionary Forces (BEF) withdrawal to Caen in Normady and the Royal Navy under harassment from Germany forces is only able to save half the force. The British Government realizes the battle in France is over and begins to prepare plans for supporting forces in the Netherlands and Russia.

Germany now free of a real threat in the West shifts 70% of it's forces to aide the Austro-Hungarians in the East against Russia.

20% of the remaining forces are used to continue to attack Belgian and Dutch cities and forts to force those nations into surrendering.

Ostfront Kampagne

October 31, 1914 - July 18, 1915

The Eastern Front Campaign as it was known in Austria-Hungary was their defense and subsequent invasion of Russia during the war. Following the end of the campaign in mid-1915 Russia was forced to accept harsh peace terms rather than risk losing control of the growing Bolshevik movement at home.

Invasion of Russia

November 21, 1914

German forces having been re-purposed from the Western Front and those in the East having halted the Russian invasion of East Prussia begin their campaign to take out Russia through an invasion.

Weiß Front-Kampagne

November 21, 1914 - March 7, 1915

The White Front Campaign:

The Invasion of Russia by German Forces.

Germany commits nearly 1.4 million soldiers to the war on the White Front spreading into three large pronged attack routes.

Antwerp Treaty

November 27, 1914

Following the combined weight of German forces in Belgium, and the loss of Antwerp the Belgium government no longer receiving support from France decides to surrender and hope for reasonable terms.

The Antwerp Treaty dictates that upon the surrender of the Netherlands, Belgium and the Netherlands will be combined into the Lowlands and will be granted self-rule, high levels of autonomy but will subsequently be forced to be a protectorate of Germany.

While reluctant the Belgium government accepts the terms sighting that the terms could have been worse.

the Hague Treaty

December 1, 1914

Following the complete loss of the nation to the Imperial German Armies, the Government of the Netherlands under Queen Wilhelmina I, surrenders to the German Army. The terms were already outlined in the Antwerp Treaty where it states that Belgium and the Netherlands will be merged in the nation of the Lowlands which while granted large amounts of autonomy and self-rule it will be a protectorate of Germany. The terms were better than they could have been.

Operation Sea Storm

March 8, 1915 - April 1, 1915

Operation Sea Storm:

A German naval invasion staged at St. Petersberg in Russia. The Goal of Sea Storm was to establish a beachhead some ten miles from the major Russia city and to scare the Russian people into believing that the Tzar was inept. However this was actually a ploy as the real task was to draw Russia reserve forces near the front towards the city to avoid losing it, thus opening the front up to a large renewed attack.

Great Collapse

April 2, 1915 - July 18, 1915

Collapse of Russian Lines:

Also known as the Great Collapse.

On the morning of April 2, 1915 over a month since Operation Sea Storm had been initiated the front had finally opened to the point that the Germans along with Austro-Hungarian, Romanian and Bulgarian armies had managed to successfully punch several holes in the Russian front encircling and capturing tens of thousands of Russian soldiers, dozens of forts and cities were cut off.

This was the end of the Russian defensive lines. The Tsar was facing uprisings at home from the Bolshevik revolutionaries and other Anti-Monarchist groups who blamed the Imperial Family for the loss of the war. The Tsar accepted harsh terms at the Prague Conference (July 19, 1915) which ended Russia's involvement in the war.

Prague Conference

July 19, 1915

Following the Great Collapse, Anti-Monarchist and Bolshevik Revolutionaries across Russia, Tsar Nicholas II makes a harsh peace agreement with the Central Powers and their allies.

Russia accepted the following terms:

-Russia will cede Poland and Lithuania to Germany.
-Russia will grant independence to Estonia, Latvia and Finland as Protectorates of Germany.
-Ukraine will be granted independence but be a protectorate of Austria.
-Crimea and the Caucasus will be ceded to the Ottoman Empire.
-In return for the cessation of lands Russia will receive military aid from Germany to end the revolutions.

NormalTimeline

This is the Historical Timeline

Franz Ferdinand Assassination

June 28, 1914

Austro-Hungarian Heir Apparent, Franz Ferdinand. Nephew to Emperor Franz Joseph is assassinated along with his wife Sophie in Sarajevo by Serbian Nationalists. This leads to the Austro-Hungarian Empire sending the Serbians an ultimatum of annexation or war.

It is rejected on the single point of annexation and thus Austro-Hungary, Germany and the Otttoman Empires prepare for the inevitable war with Serbia, Russia, France and subsequently Great Britain.

German Assurance to A-H

July 5, 1914

Austro-Hungary seeks German support in war against Serbia if Russia intervenes. Germany agrees.

Serbian Ultimatum

July 23, 1914

Austria-Hungary sends ultimatum to Serbia. Serbian response deemed unsatisfactory.

Netherlands Neutral

July 28, 1914

Immediately following the declaration of war against Serbia by Austria-Hungary the Netherlands declares its Neutrality in the war.

A-H vs Serbia

July 28, 1914

Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia following the Ultimatum. Russia begins mobilizing its forces in preparation of a war in support of Austria.

Germany vs Russia

August 1, 1914

After failing to cease their hostility towards Austria-Hungary, Germany declares war upon Russia in support of their ally.

German - Ottoman Alliance

August 1, 1914

In response to war with Russia, Germany secures a secret alliance wit the Ottoman Empire in the growing conflict, promising the Balkans and parts of Russia to the Ottomans if victorious.

Italy Neutral

August 1, 1914

Following Germany's declaration of war against Russia and Serbia, along with the tumultuous situation coming from the growing conflict, Italy breaks its treaty with Austria-Hungary and Germany instead declaring its neutrality in the conflict sighting their former treaty as defensive only.

Invasion of Luxembourg

August 2, 1914

Knowing France would uphold their treaty with Russia. Germany invades the neutral state of Luxembourg to secure a better invasion point against France when the time comes.

Germany vs France

August 3, 1914

In response to wanting a war with France and the French not breaking their treaty with Russia, Germany preemptively declares war upon France and begins preparations to invade Belgium to secure a route into Northern France.

UK vs Germany

August 4, 1914

Bound by a treaty to support Belgian independence, the United Kingdom declares war upon Germany for invading Belgium.

US Neutral

August 4, 1914

Knowing this war would become worse and grow into a true world conflict, the United States declares its neutrality.

Invasion of Belgium

August 4, 1914

German military operations in Belgium were intended to bring the 1st, 2nd and 3rd armies into positions in Belgium, from which they could invade France, which led to sieges of Belgian fortresses along the Meuse river at Namur, after the fall of Liège on August 7 and the surrender of the last forts on 16–17 August. The government abandoned the capital, Brussels, on August 17 and after fighting on the Gete river, the Belgian field army withdrew westwards, to the National Redoubt at Antwerp on August 19. Brussels was occupied the next day and Namur was besieged on August 21.

After the battles of Mons and Charleroi, the bulk of the German armies marched south into France, leaving small forces to garrison Brussels and the Belgian railways. The III Reserve Corps advanced to the fortified zone around Antwerp and a division of the IV Reserve Corps took over in Brussels. The Belgian field army made several sorties from Antwerp in late August and September, to harass German communications and to assist the French and the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), by keeping German troops in Belgium. German troop withdrawals to reinforce the main armies in France, were postponed to repulse a Belgian sortie from 9–13 September and a corps in transit was retained in Belgium for several days. Belgian resistance and German fear of francs-tireurs, led the Germans to implement a policy of schrecklichkeit ("frightfulness") against Belgian civilians soon after the invasion, in which massacres, executions, hostage taking and the burning of towns and villages took place and became known as the Rape of Belgium.

Montegnegro vs A-H

August 5, 1914

In support of Serbia and bolstered by Russia the tiny state of Montenegro in the Balkans declares war against the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Serbia vs Germany

August 6, 1914

Supported by Russia the Serbian Nation declares war upon Germany.

A-H vs Russia

August 6, 1914

Finally prepared the Austro-Hungarian Empire declares war against Russia.

Montenegro vs Germany

August 9, 1914

Supported by Russian and Serbia the state of Montenegro declares war upon Germany.

A-H vs France

August 11, 1914

Austria-Hungary comes to the aid of Germany by declaring war upon France.

UK vs A-H

August 12, 1914

Following the A-H declaration of war on France the UK declares war against the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Battle of the Frontiers

August 14, 1914 - August 24, 1914

The Battle of the Frontiers:

The Battle of the Frontiers was a series of battles fought along the eastern frontier of France and in southern Belgium shortly after the outbreak of World War I. The battles resolved the military strategies of the French Chief of Staff General Joseph Joffre with Plan XVII and an offensive interpretation of the German Aufmarsch II deployment plan by Helmuth von Moltke the Younger. The German concentration on the right (northern) flank, to wheel through Belgium and attack the French in the rear, was delayed by the movement of General Charles Lanrezac's Fifth Army towards the north-west to intercept them and the presence of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on his left flank. The Franco-British were driven back by the Germans, who were able to invade northern France. French and British rearguard actions delayed the German advance, allowing the French time to transfer their forces to the west to defend Paris, resulting in the First Battle of the Marne.

Invasion of Germany

August 17, 1914

Russia begins an invasion of Germany in East Prussia.

First Battle of Tannenburg

August 17, 1914 - September 2, 1914

The First Battle of the Tannenberg had seen the German 8th Field Army under the command of General Paul von Hindenburg be moved from a reserve support role for the invasion of France, across the German Empire to halt the Russian invasion of Eastern Prussia.

Following several battles Hindenburg and the 8th Field Army were successful in pushing the Russians back and halting their invasion of German East Prussia.

A-H vs Belgium

August 22, 1914

Austria-Hungary declares war upon Belgium.

Japan vs Germany

August 23, 1914

Seizing the opportunity to take German Possessions in the Pacific region, the Empire of Japan declares war upon Germany.

The Great Retreat

August 24, 1914 - September 28, 1914

The Great Retreat, also known as the Retreat from Mons, is the name given to the long withdrawal to the River Marne, in August and September 1914, by the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and the French Fifth Army, Allied forces on the Western Front in World War I, after their defeat by the Imperial German armies at the Battle of Charleroi (21 August) and the Battle of Mons (23 August). A counter-offensive by the Fifth Army, with some assistance from the BEF at the First Battle of Guise (Battle of St. Quentin 29–30 August), failed to end the German advance and the Franco-British retreat continued to and beyond the Marne. From 5–12 September, the First Battle of the Marne ended the Allied retreat and forced the German armies to retire towards the Aisne river and fight the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September). Reciprocal attempts to outflank the opposing armies to the north followed, known as the Race to the Sea (17 September – 17 October).

Japan vs A-H

August 25, 1914

Japan declares war upon Austria-Hungary.

Race to the Sea

September 17, 1914 - October 19, 1914

The Great Retreat, also known as the Retreat from Mons, is the name given to the long withdrawal to the River Marne, in August and September 1914, by the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and the French Fifth Army, Allied forces on the Western Front in World War I, after their defeat by the Imperial German armies at the Battle of Charleroi (21 August) and the Battle of Mons (23 August). A counter-offensive by the Fifth Army, with some assistance from the BEF at the First Battle of Guise (Battle of St. Quentin 29–30 August), failed to end the German advance and the Franco-British retreat continued to and beyond the Marne. From 5–12 September, the First Battle of the Marne ended the Allied retreat and forced the German armies to retire towards the Aisne river and fight the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September). Reciprocal attempts to outflank the opposing armies to the north followed, known as the Race to the Sea (17 September – 17 October).

Russia vs Ottomans

November 1, 1914

Russia declare war upon the Ottoman Empire.

Montenegro vs Ottomans

November 3, 1914

Montenegro as an ally of Russia declares war upon the Ottoman Empire.

France + UK vs Ottomans

November 5, 1914

The United Kingdom and France simultaneously declare war upon the Ottoman Empire.

Ottomans Declare Jihad

November 11, 1914

Sultan Mehmed V of the Ottoman Empire declares Jihad against all Allied Nations. All enemies of the Austro-Hungarian and German Empires become Islamic Religious Targets and enemies of the Ottoman Empire.