Church History

Main

World History Periods

Roman Empire

27 BC - 476

Middle ("Dark") Ages

476 - 1350

Renaissance

1350 - 1500

Dates are VERY approximate!

Scientific Revolution

1543 - 1799

1543: Nicolaus Copernicus publishes his De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres)
End date is very approximate

Enlightenment

1637 - 1789

1637: Descartes publishes his Discourse on Method
through
1789: French Revolution (Napoleonic wars of 1804-1815 are also taken as an end point)

Industrial Revolution

1760 - 1830

Dates are very approximate

Age of Revolution

1775 - 1848

"Atomic" Age

1945 - 2013

Church History Periods

Apostolic Church

33 AD - 100 AD

Church "Fathers"

100 - December 9, 749

Legalized Christianity

313 - 380

"Official" Christianity

380 - 476

Christianity is the official religion of the Roman Empire

Conversion of Europe

490 - 1015

Beginning with the conversion of Clovis, a Frankish king (converted 497); ending with the death of St. Vladimir (1015), who established Christianity in Russia

Crusades

1095 - 1291

From the calling of the first crusade by Pope Urban II (“Deus vult!”/ “God wills it!”) to the fall of Acre, the last Christian territory in the Holy Land, in 1291. - See more at: http://www.preceden.com/timelines/133576-church-history#sthash.x6g8POSn.dpuf

Avignon Papacy

1305 - 1378

Great Western Schism

1378 - 1417

Protestant Reformation

1517 - 1648

Peace of Westphalia

1648

Ends the Thirty Years' War, declaring:
1) All parties would now recognise the Peace of Augsburg of 1555, by which each prince would have the right to determine the religion of his own state, the options being Roman Catholicism, Lutheranism, and now Calvinism (the principle of cuius regio, eius religio)
2) Christians living in principalities where their denomination was not the established church were guaranteed the right to practice their faith in public during allotted hours and in private at their will. (Wikipedia)

Wars

First Crusade

1095 - 1099

Second Crusade

1144

Third Crusade

1189 - 1192

Fourth Crusade

1201 - 1204

Children's Crusade

1212

The Hundred Years' War

1337 - 1453

Thirty Years' War

1618 - 1648

People

St. Ignatius of Antioch

50 AD - 107 AD

Nero

60 AD - 68 AD

St. Anthony of Egypt

251 - 356

Early Hermit

Diocletian

284 - 305

St. Augustine of Hippo

354 - 430

St. Benedict of Nursia

480 - 543

Founded the Benedictine order. Wrote "The Rule of St. Benedict"

Boethius

480 - 524

St. Bruno

1030 - 1101

Founded Carthusians

St. Anselm of Canterbury

1033 - 1109

Hildegard of Bingen

1098 - 1179

King Henry II (England)

1133 - 1189

St. Francis of Assisi

1182 - 1226

St. Thomas Aquinas

1225 - 1274

St. Catherine of Siena

1347 - 1380

Jan Hus

1369 - 1415

St. Joan of Arc

1412 - 1431

Leonardo da Vinci

1452 - 1519

Cardinal Wolsey

1473 - 1530

Michelangelo

1475 - 1564

St. Thomas More

1478 - July 6, 1535

Martin Luther

1483 - 1546

Raphael

1483 - 1520

Ulrich Zwingli

1484 - 1531

Henry VIII

1491 - 1547

St. Ignatius of Loyola

1491 - 1556

John Calvin

1509 - 1564

St. Teresa of Avila

1515 - 1582

Mary Tudor (Mary I)

1516 - 1558

Queen Elizabeth I

September 7, 1533 - March 24, 1603

Events

Council of Jerusalem

50 AD

c. 49/50 (exact date unknown)

Great Fire of Rome

64 AD

Diocletian Creates Tetrarchy

290

Battle of Milvian Bridge

312

Council of Nicea

325

Council of Constantinople

381

Refutes Nestorian heresy

Death of St. Paul of Thebes

430

Council of Ephesus

431

Discussed two natures of Christ; Mary as "mother of God" (Theotokos)

Council of Chalcedon

451

Conversion of Clovis, king of the Franks

497

Council of Constantinople II

553

Council of Constantinople III

680 - 681

Exarchate of Ravenna Falls to Lombards

751

Donation of Pepin

756

Council of Nicea II

787

Allowed for the veneration of icons. Distinguished between latria (worship due to God) and dulia (honor, reverence), the latter of which was appropriate to give to icons

Feast of the Triumph of Orthodoxy

842

Battle of Lechfeld

955

Great Schism

July 16, 1054

Battle of Hastings

1066

Humiliation of Henry IV at Canossa

1077

Cistercians Founded

1098

Murder of St. Thomas Becket

1170

Inquisition Founded

1231

Battle of Agincourt

1415

Council of Basel-Ferrara-Florence

1431 - 1445

Fall of Constantinople

May 29, 1453

Columbus "Discovers" the New World

1492

Our Lady of Guadalupe

December 9, 1531

Cardinal St. John Fisher Executed

1535

Anne Boleyn Beheaded

1536

Council of Trent

1545 - 1563

Elizabeth I Crowned Queen

January 15, 1559

Queen Elizabeth I Begins Persecution of Catholics

1571

St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

August 24, 1572

Gunpowder Plot to Kill King James I (England)

1605

Colony of Maryland Established by Lord Baltimore

1632

Martyrdom of St. Isaac Jogues

1646

Martyrdom of St. John de Brébeuf

1649

Documents

Trajan's Rescript

112

Edict of Milan

313

Boethius' "Consolations of Philosophy"

524

Treaty of Verdun

843

Divides Carolingian Empire into 3: France (Charles), Middle Kingdom (Low Countries to northern Italy: Lothar), and eastern kingdom basically of Germany (Louis)

Dictatus Papae

1075

Pope has powers from God: Power to convene/ratify a council, define tenets of the faith, appoint, transfer and remove bishops, and to depose temporal rulers, and subjects of a temporal ruler to appeal to papacy to bring charges against temporal ruler. Priest guilty of simony: removed from hierarchy, and loss of power. Priest guilty of fornication: unable to say Mass.

Concordat of Worms

1122

Agreement between Henry V (HRE; second son of Henry IV) and pope. Ended Lay Investiture Controversy. First Part: leaves spiritual investiture to Church, temporal investiture to civil authorities. Emperor permits free election of bishops. Condemnation of simony. Emperor can veto bishops by withholding investiture of temporal authority of bishops.

Constitutions of Clarendon

1164

King wants to control elections of abbots and bishops. Clerics were to be tried in civil courts. Appeals to Rome first required consent of king. King’s court is last resort for ecclesiastical appeals.

Magna Charta

1215

Clericos Laicos

1296

Letter written from Pope Boniface VIII to King Philip the Fair. Asserts that kings cannot tax clergy without papal permission. Philip cuts off all French shipments of gold, silver, jewels to Italy. This forces Boniface to back down.

Six Articles

1439

Published by Henry VIII, declared tenets of faith of Church of England. Maintained Catholic beliefs.

Exsurge Domine

1520

Papal Bull denouncing Luther, giving him two months to recant or be excommunicated. Luther burns it and the book of Canon Law.

Augsburg Confession

1530

Diet (legislative assembly) meets in Augsburg to try to form alliance between Catholics and Protestants against Turkish threat. Melanchton drafts statement of basic Lutheran teachings (the Augsburg Confession).

Act of Supremacy

1534

Calvin's "Institutes of the Christian Religion"

1536

Peace of Augsburg

1555

Edict of Nantes

1598

French King Henry IV allows tolerance for Protestants, who can hold Protestant services in the privacy of their own homes; legal practice of Protestantism if majority of town is Protestant; some towns could fortify themselves with Protestant garrisons; Protestants and Catholics have same civil rights, and Protestants can run for civil office and attend Catholic universities.

Sir Francis Bacon's Novum Organum

1620

English Bill of Rights

1689

Act of Settlement

1701

William and Mary’s “Act of Settlement” bars Catholics from political office

Rousseau's The Social Contract

1762