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Boston Schoolmasters

1635

"In 1635 Boston saw the need to hire a schoolmaster 'for the teaching and nurturing of children with us' "

New York School

1737

In 1737 the New York African American Free School opened in New York City

City Schools

1800

In 1800 the city had seven schools open for black students.

Thomas Gallaudet

1817

In 1817 Thomas Gallaudet founds a school for people who are hearing impaired.

Elemenatry School

1820

In 1820 Boston opened a separate elementary school for African American children.

Maine Gives Rights

1820

Maine immediately gives right to vote and education to all male citizens because of the Missouri Compromise.

Willards Troy Seminary

1821 - 1872

Between 1821-1872 more than 12,000 women attended Willards Troy Seminary school.

Troy, New York

1821

In 1821 some people of Troy, New York had an educator named Emma Willard found a college-level institution for women.

Where the Word Educate comes from

1823

The word Educate comes from a Greek word 'E Ducate". The word means "To Lead the Young Out Of Hell". The reason why this is the word for it is because the Romans were really scared of going to hell, and their theory was that only the uneducated went to hell.

Louis Braille

1829

In 1829 French educator Louis Braille creates a system of reading and writing that uses raised dots for people who were blind, hence the Braille Reading System.

Unequal Education

1830

In the 1830's many people had unequal education because there would be no teacher.

New England Reformers

1830

The Common School Movement began in 'in earnest' in the 1830's in New England as reformers "began to argue successfully for a greater government role in the schooling of all children."

Samuel Gridley Howe

1831

In 1831 Samuel Gridley Howe opened a school called the Perkins Institution in Massachusetts for people with visual impaired.

Horace Mann

1837

"....He became the first secretary of the State Board of Education for Massachusetts"

Mount Holyoke

1837

Mount Holyoke Seminary in Massachusetts was founded by Mary Lyon in 1837.

Institue for Colored Youth

1842

The Institute for Colored Youth was founded in 1842 in Philadelphia.

Avery College

1849

Avery College was opened in 1849, also in Philadelphia.

African Americans

1855

In 1855, Boston lets African American children attend white schools.

Massachusetts

1855

In 1855 Massachusetts had become the first state to abolish legal segregation.

Oberlin College

1860

Oberlin College, which opened in Ohio, was the first co-educational college in the United States.