Revolutionary France

Book

Ferrand

February 11 1753 - July 17 1791

Gauthier

August 7 1764 - feb 1794

2 sisters 1 brother

Louvel

September 28 1764 - Aug 10 1791

Gabrielle

April 19 1766 - Sept 1792

Baudouin

September 30, 1768 - June 1790

Brave friend

Corin

November 4, 1773 - June 1790

Odette

March 19 1774 - 1800

Baudoin Arrested

Nov 18 1785 - feb 6, 1789

Odette thrown to street

July 1789

Baudouin and Corin are killed

June 1790

Gabrielle Arrested

November 1790

Ferrand dies, Louvel takes over

July 17 1791

Main

Bodies Put into Catacombs

August 28, 1788 - August 29, 1788

From riots in the Place de Greve, the Hotel de Brienne, and Rue Meslee

Estates-General of 1789

May 5, 1789 - July 17, 1789

Meeting of the three Estates to discuss fiscal problems
First- Clergy
Second- Nobles
Third- Common People

Church property expropriated

Nov 2 1789

Monastical vows are prohibited

Feb 13 1790

Aristocratic titles abolished

june 19 1790

Public officials take oath of loyalty

Nov 27 1790

to new french nation

Louis XVI flees

June 20 1791 - June 25 1791

Monarchy Abolished

Sept 21, 1792

Declared a Republic

Sept 22, 1792

French Republican Calendar

September 23, 1793 - January 1, 1806

Revolution (Battles/Riots)

Tennis Court Oath

June 17, 1789

The Oath signified the first time that French citizens formally stood in opposition to Louis XVI

Great Fear

July 1789 - August 1789

Peasant Riots

Storming of the Bastille

July 12,1789 - July 14, 1789

Women's March On Versailles

October 5 1789 - Oct 6 1789

Parisians, led by a large number of women, march upon Versailles and force the royal family back to Paris, where they take up residence at the Tuileries. Louis XVI is considered by many a "Prisoner" in Paris. The Assembly, still in Versailles, declares, in the spirit of constitutional monarchy, its inseparability from the king. Its meetings are transferred to a hall close to the Tuileries.

Royal Flight to Varennes

June 20 1791 - June 21 1791

Invasion of the Tuileries

June 20 1792

They demand the return of the Jacobin ministers. They force Louis to don a liberty cap (bonnet rouge or bonnet phrygien) and to drink to the health of the people.

The Brunswick Manifesto

july 28 1792

The Duke of Brunswick, commanding general of the Austro-Prussian Army, in an inflammatory declaration, warns Parisians to obey Louis XVI. It threatens them with violent punishment if they do not. The Assembly is offended and orders the sections of Paris to ready themselves. The Manifesto creates both fear and anger in Paris.

Reign of Terror

September 5, 1793 - July 28, 1794

Coup of 18 Brumaire

November 9, 1799 - November 10, 1799

Literature and Art

What is the Third Estate by Abbé Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès

January 1789

In the pamphlet, Sieyès argued that the Third Estate – the common people of France – constituted a complete nation, and would be better off without the "dead weight" of the privileged orders.

Le Patriote francais by Jacques Pieree Brissot

April 10, 1789 - June 2, 1793

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

August 26 1789

L'Ami du peuple by Jean-Paul Marat

September 12, 1789

8 page daily, newspaper

Civil Constitution of the Clergy

July 12 1790

It provides for the appointment of all church officers, from archbishop down, by the National Assembly; thus, a Gallican Catholic Church is established.

Leaders

King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette

May 10 1774 - September 21 1792

National Convention

Sept 20 1792 - Nov 2 1795

National Convention - Moderates

Sept 20 1792

The body that replaced the Legislative Assembly following a successful election in 1792.

French Republic

Sept 22 1792 - may 18 1804

National Convention - Jacobins

1793

Louis XVI Executed

Jan 21 1793

Marie Antoinette Executed

Oct 16 1793

First French Empire

Dec 2 1804 - 1815

Napoleon

Bourbon Restoration

April 6 1814 - 1830