Luminism

Luminism

Luminism is an American landscape painting style of the 1850s – 1870s, characterized by effects of light in landscapes, through using aerial perspective, and concealing visible brushstrokes. Luminist landscapes emphasize tranquillity, and often depict calm, reflective water and a soft, hazy sky.

Robert Salmon

1775 - 1845

Robert Salmon (1775-c. 1845) was a maritime artist, active in both England and America. Salmon completed nearly 1,000 paintings, all save one of maritime scenes or seascapes. He is widely considered the Father of American Luminism.

Fritz Henry Lane

1804 - 1864

Fitz Henry Lane (born Nathaniel Rogers Lane, also known as Fitz Hugh Lane) (December 19, 1804 – August 14, 1865) was an American painter and printmaker of a style that would later be called Luminism, for its use of pervasive light.

George Galeb Bingham

1811 - 1879

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George Caleb Bingham

A self-portrait by George Caleb Bingham, painted 1834-35
Born March 20, 1811
Augusta County, Virginia
Died July 7, 1879 (aged 68)
Nationality American
Field Painting
Training [Self taught by study of prints of Old Masters and copybooks]
Movement Luminism

George Caleb Bingham (March 20, 1811 – July 7, 1879) was an American artist whose paintings of American life in the frontier lands along the Missouri River exemplify the Luminist style. Left to languish in obscurity, Bingham's work was rediscovered in the 1930s. By the time of his bicentennial in 2011, he was considered one of the greatest American painters of the 19th century. That year the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné Supplement Of Paintings & Drawings announced the authentication of ten recently discovered paintings by Bingham; like all but about 5% of his works, they are unsigned.

Frederic Edwin Church

1826 - 1900

Frederic Edwin Church (May 4, 1826 – April 7, 1900) was an American landscape painter born in Hartford, Connecticut. He was a central figure in the Hudson River School of American landscape painters. While committed to the natural sciences, he was "always concerned with including a spiritual dimension in his works."

David Johnson

1827 - 1908

David Johnson (May 10, 1827 – January 30, 1908) was a member of the second generation of Hudson River School painters.

He was born in New York City, New York. He studied for two years at the antique school of the National Academy of Design. He also studied briefly with the Hudson River artist Jasper Francis Cropsey. Along with John Frederick Kensett and John William Casilear, he was best known for the development of Luminism. His most important work was Haines Falls, Kauterskill Clove, 1849. Johnson wrote on the back of the painting, "My first study from nature. Made in company with J.F. Kensett, and J.W. Casilear," making this an important historic document. By 1850, Johnson was exhibiting regularly at the National Academy of Design in New York, where he became an associate in 1860. He exhibited extensively in other major American art centers, including Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia. He died in Walden, New York, in 1908.

Albert Bierstadt

1830 - 1902

Albert Bierstadt (January 7, 1830 – February 18, 1902) was a German-American painter best known for his lavish, sweeping landscapes of the American West. In obtaining the subject matter for these works, Bierstadt joined several journeys of the Westward Expansion. Though not the first artist to record these sites, Bierstadt was the foremost painter of these scenes for the remainder of the 19th century.

Bierstadt was part of the Hudson River School, not an institution but rather an informal group of like-minded painters. The Hudson River School style involved carefully detailed paintings with romantic, almost glowing lighting, sometimes called luminism. An important interpreter of the western landscape, Bierstadt, along with Thomas Moran, is also grouped with the Rocky Mountain School.

Edmond Darch Lewis

1835 - 1910

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Edmund Darch Lewis (October 17, 1835 - August 12, 1910) was an American landscape painter known for his prolific style and marine oils and watercolors. Lewis was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a well-to-do family. He started training at age 15 with German-born Paul Weber (1823–1916) of the Hudson River School. At age 19 he exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and was elected an Associate of the Academy at age 24.