Timeline of the Internet

Main

The ARPANET

1960 - February 28, 1990

NPL

1960 - Present

RAND

1960 - Present

CYCLADES

1970 - 1981

ARPANET + RAND + NPL + CYCLADES = The Internet

1989 - Present

The World Wide Web

1989 - Present

AOL

1990 - Present

America Online, or AOL for short.
America Online originally charged users for every hour they spent on the internet. This was replaced with an unlimited monthly fee in 1996.

What the World Wide Wed gives us

Present

The web has revolutionized the way we do businesses. Some of the largest businesses today sprang up out of nowhere. Amazon.com, Netflix, and more built their businesses exclusively around the web. But it’s not just the big businesses that have benefited; small businesses can now sell their products to the entire world, rather than just to the people in their town.
The web has also been a means for people to share their talents. People have started blogs, shared their music or videos, and many have received so many followers that they have been able to make a living at doing what they love. Before, you had to own a newspaper or a TV station to broadcast your message to the world. Now, you just need access to the web.

New Free Culture

Present

It isn’t free to connect to the web, but once you’re there, it’s pretty easy to find all the content you want—for free.
The main idea on the web, then, is to provide a service for free, and make money some other way. A musician might give away their songs, and then charge for concerts. A director might give away a short movie, and then sell the DVD; or even use it to try to land a job with a large production company.

Google

Present

Many people think of Google as a search engine company. But how much did you pay the last time you did a search on Google? How can Google be one of the richest and biggest tech companies in the world, if they give away their main service?
The answer lies in information. Google deals in information, not search. When you do a Google search, sometimes you’re looking for information, but sometimes you’re looking to buy something. If Google knows you want to buy a product, then it can sell that information to people who have the product you’re looking for. So when you search for ‘basketball’, Google can charge a few pennies to a particular sports store, and display their ad first. Even though Google makes only a few pennies on each transaction, if you times that by millions of people every day buying online, you’ll understand Google’s business model.

Number of websites

1

1970 - 1992

4

1992 - 1993

623

1993 - 1994

10,022

1994 - 1995

23,500

1995 - 1996

603,367

1996 - 1997

1,681,868

1997 - 1998

3,689,227

1998 - 1999

9,560,491

1999 - 2000

25,675,581

2000 - Present

Today there are over 230 million web sites.

Present

And remember, those are sites, not web pages. There are billions of pages that search engines store.

Number of computers

4

October 29, 1969 - 1970

There were four computers on ARPANET. One each at UCLA, Stanford, UC Santa Barbara, and the University of Utah.

13

1970 - 1971

23

1971 - 1977

100

1977 - 1984

1000

1984 - 1987

10,000

1987 - 1990

100,000

1990 - 1992

1 million

1992 - 1996

10 million

1996 - 2001

100 million

2001 - Present

Today, over 1.7 billion users have access to the internet

Present