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Eastern woodland Indians

800 bc - 800 ad

The Eastern Woodland Indians are Native Americans that inhabit the eastern part of the United States.Eastern Woodland Indians kill and prepare their own food.

Triangle slave trade

1450 ac - 1750 ac

All three stages of the Triangular Trade shape it makes proved lucrative for merchants.The first stage of the Triangular Trade involved taking manufactured goods from Europe to Africa: cloth, spirit, tobacco, beads, cowrie shells, metal goods, and guns.

Mercantilism

1500 - 1778

Mercantilism is the economic doctrine that government control of foreign trade is of paramount importance for ensuring the military security of the country.Mercantilism was a cause of frequent European wars in that time and motivated colonial expansion

San Miguel de gualdape

1526 - 1527

San Miguel de Gualdape was the first European settlement inside what is now United States territory, founded by Spaniard Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón in 1526. It was to last only three months of winter before being abandoned in early 1527.

Port Royal

1562 - 1874

Port Royal is a Lowcountry town in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States. Largely because of annexation of surrounding areas (including Parris Island), the population of Port Royal rose from 3,950 in 2000 to 10,678 in 2010, a 170% increase.

13 English colonies

1607 - 1732

The British empire settled its first permanent colony in the Americas at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607. This was the but the first of 13 colonies in North America.

Proprietary Colonies

1624 - 1627

PROPRIETARY COLONIES were grants of land in the form of a charter, or a license to rule, for individuals or groups. They were used to settle areas rapidly with British subjects at the proprietors' expense during the costly settlement years.

Royal Colony

1624 - 1981

A Crown colony, also known in the 17th century as royal colony, was a type of colonial administration of the English and later British Empire.crown or royal, colonies were ruled by a governor appointed by the Monarch

Slave Codes

1712 - 1770

Slave codes were laws in each US state, which defined the status of slaves and the rights of masters. These codes gave slave-owners absolute power over the African slaves.

Yemassee War

1715 - 1717

the Yamasee War (also spelled Yemassee War) (1715–1717) was a conflict between British settlers of colonial South Carolina and various Native American Indian tribes, including the Yamasee, Muscogee, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Catawba, Apalachee, Apalachicola, Yuchi, Savannah River Shawnee, Congaree, Waxhaw, Pee Dee, Cape Fear, Cheraw, and others.

Stono rebellion

1739 ac - 1740 ac

The Stono Rebellion was a slave rebellion that commenced on 9 September 1739, in the colony of South Carolina. It was the largest slave uprising in the British mainland colonies prior to the American Revolution.

French and Indian War

1754 - 1763

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) is the American name for the North American theater of the Seven Years' War. The war was fought primarily between the colonies of British America and New France, with both sides supported by military units from their parent countries of Great Britain and France. In 1756, the war escalated from a regional affair into a world-wide conflict.

Cherokee War

1758 - 1761

The Anglo–Cherokee War the "war with those in the red coats" or was also known from the Anglo-European perspective as: the Cherokee War, the Cherokee Uprising, or the Cherokee Rebellion. The war was a conflict between British forces in North America and Cherokee Indian tribes during the French and Indian War.

Rice and indigo trade

1763 - 1783

Indigo, the dyestuff most widely used in America during the 18th and 19th centuries, is not a native of this country. It is a blue dye derived from the leaves of a leguminous plant which grew in India and Egypt long before the Christian era and later was used by the Romans in making an ink they called indicum.

Sugar Act

1764 - 1766

The Sugar Act was passed in 1764. The British placed a tax on sugar, wine, and other important things. The British did this because they wanted more money

Stamp Act

1765 - 1766

The Stamp Act 1765 imposed a direct tax by the British Parliament specifically on the colonies of British America, and it required that many printed materials in the colonies be produced on stamped paper produced in London, carrying an embossed revenue stamp.

Sons of Liberty

1765 - 1783

After defeating France in the French and Indian War, the British provide offices for hundreds of military officers and 10,000 men, and intended to have the Americans pay for it. It passed a series of taxes, and when the Americans refused to pay on the argument of "No Taxation without Representation"

Regulator Movement

1767 - 1771

Regulator movement, designation for two groups, one in South Carolina, the other in North Carolina, that tried to effect governmental changes in the 1760s. In South Carolina, the Regulator movement was an organized effort by backcountry settlers to restore law and order and establish institutions of local government.

Denmark Vesey Plot

1767 - 1822

Denmark Vesey originalaly was an African-Caribbean who was most famous for planning a slave rebellion in the United States. He was enslaved in the Caribbean before being brought to the United States and was probably of Coromantee background. After purchasing his freedom, he planned what would have been one of the largest slave rebellions in the United States.

Tea Act

1773 - 1783

The Tea Act of 1773 was one of several measures imposed on the American colonists by the heavily indebted British government in the decade leading up to the American Revolutionary War (1775-83)

Revolutionary War

1775 - 1783

Revolutionary War in the United States, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, but gradually grew into a world war between Britain on one side and the newly formed United States, France, Netherlands and Spain on the other.

South Carolina Constitution of 1776

1776 - 1777

Whereas the British Parliament, claiming of late years a right to bind the North American colonies by law in all cases whatsoever, have enacted statutes for raising a revenue in those colonies and disposing of such revenue as they thought proper, without the consent and against the will of the colonists

Declaration of Independence

1776 - 1777

The Declaration of Independence was a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies,

Constitution

1777 - 1788

The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. The first three Articles of the Constitution establish the rules and separate powers of the three branches of the federal government

Articles of Confederation

1777 - 1781

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776

Battle of Camden

1780 - 1781

The Battle of Camden was a major victory for the British in the Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War.On August 16, 1780, British forces under Lieutenant General Charles, Lord Cornwallis routed the American forces of Major General Horatio Gates about five miles north of Camden,

Battle of Kings Mountain

1780 - 1781

The Battle of Kings Mountain was a decisive battle between the Patriot and Loyalist militias in the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War. The actual battle took place on October 7, 1780, nine miles south of the present-day town of Kings Mountain, North Carolina in rural York County, South Carolina, where the Patriot militia defeated the Loyalist militia commanded by British Major Patrick Ferguson of the 71st Foot.

Battle of Cowpens

1781 - 1782

The Battle of Cowpens (January 17, 1781) was a decisive victory by Continental army forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, in the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War. It was a turning point in the reconquest of South Carolina from the British.

Battle of Eutaw Springs

1781 - 1782

The Battle of Eutaw Springs was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, and was the last major engagement of the war in the Carolinas.

3/5 Compromise

1787 - 1793

The Three-Fifths Compromise was a compromise between Southern and Northern states reached during the Philadelphia convention of 1787. After proposed compromises of 1⁄2 by Benjamin Harrison of Virginia and 3⁄4 by several New Englanders failed to gain sufficient support, Congress finally settled on the 3⁄5 ratio proposed by James Madison.

Great Compromise

1787 - 1788

The Connecticut Compromise (also known as the Great Compromise of 1787 or Sherman's Compromise) was an agreement that large and small states reached during the Constitutional Convention of 1787 that in part defined the legislative structure and representation that each state would have under the United States Constitution.

Commerce Compromise

1787 - 1905

The southern states feared that the Congress would be controlled by northern commercial interests rather than by the agricultural interests of the South. The compromise followed from that fear.

Cotton Gin

1794 - 1850

A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, allowing for much greater productivity than manual cotton separation. The fibers are processed into clothing or other cotton goods, and any undamaged seeds may be used to grow more cotton or to produce cottonseed oil and meal.

Embargo Act

1807 - 1809

The Embargo Act of 1807 was a general embargo enacted by the United States Congress against Great Britain and France during the Napoleonic Wars.

War of 1812

1812 - 1815

The War of 1812 was a 32-month military conflict between the United States and the British Empire and their allies which resulted in no territorial change, but a resolution of many issues which remained from the American War of Independence.

William T. Sherman

1820 - 1891

William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author. He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65), for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States. Military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general.

Nullification Controversy

1828 - 1832

The Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson created by South Carolina's 1832 Ordinance of Nullification. This ordinance declared by the power of the State that the federal Tariffs of 1828 and 1832

Abolitionist Movement

1830 - 1870

The goal of the abolitionist movement was the immediate emancipation of all slaves and the end of racial discrimination and segregation. Advocating for immediate emancipation distinguished abolitionists from more moderate anti-slavery advocates who argued for gradual emancipation, and from free-soil activists who sought to restrict slavery to existing areas and prevent its spread further west.

Robert Smalls

1839 - 1915

Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 – February 23, 1915) was an enslaved African American who, during and after the American Civil War, became a ship's pilot, sea captain, and politician. He freed himself, his crew and their families from slavery on May 13, 1862, by commandeering a Confederate transport ship, the CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, and sailing it to freedom beyond the Federal blockade.

Total War

1850 - 1864

Total war is a war in which a belligerent engages in the complete mobilization of fully available resources and population.

Kansas-Nebraska Act

1854 - 1861

The Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 (10 Stat. 277) created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, opening new lands for settlement, and had the effect of repealing the Missouri Compromise of 1820 by allowing settlers in those territories to determine through Popular Sovereignty whether they would allow slavery within each territory.

Dred Scott Decision

1857 - 1858

On March 6, 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney delivered the Supreme Court's decision against Dred Scott, a slave who maintained he had been emancipated as a result of having lived with his master in the free state of Illinois and in federal territory where slavery was forbidden by the Missouri Compromise.

Election of 1860

1860 - 1864

The United States presidential election of 1860 was the 19th quadrennial presidential election. The election was held on Tuesday, November 6, 1860 and served as the immediate impetus for the outbreak of the American Civil War.

Ft Sumter

1861 - 1862

Fort Sumter is a Third System masonry sea fort located in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. The fort is best known as the site upon which the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at the Battle of Fort Sumter. In 1966, the site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Creation of the Confederate States of America

1861 - 1865

The Confederate States of America (CSA), also known as the Confederacy, was a government set up from 1861 to 1865 by a number of Southern slave states that had declared their secession from the United States. The Confederacy recognized as members eleven states that had formally declared secession, two additional states with less formal declarations, and one new territory.

Civil War

1861 - 1865

The American Civil War, also known as the War between the States or simply the Civil war was a civil war fought from 1861 to 1865 between the United States and several Southern slave states that had declared their secession and formed the Confederate States of America. The war had its origin in the fractious issue of slavery, and, after four years of bloody combat, the Confederacy was defeated, slavery was abolished, and the difficult Reconstruction process of restoring unity and guaranteeing rights to the freed slaves began.

Lincoln’s assassination

1865 - 1866

The assassination of United States President Abraham Lincoln took place on Good Friday,April 14, 1865, as the American Civil War was drawing to a close. The assassination occurred five days after the commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, surrendered to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant and the Union Army of the Potomac. Lincoln was the first American president to be assassinated,

Plantation System

1895 - 1896

A plantation economy is an economy which is based on agricultural mass production, usually of a few staple products grown on large farms called plantations. Plantation economies rely on the export of cash crops as a source of income.

Cotton Trade

1980 - 1990

The total international trade is estimated to be $12 billion. Africa's share of the cotton trade has doubled since 1980.

Secessionist

1991 - 1998

Secession is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or especially a political entity. Threats of secession can also be a strategy for achieving more limited goals.