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Notes

Events over the years

Eastern Woodland Indians

1512 - 1561

The Indians in the Eastern Woodland Culture lived east of the Plains Indians. At that time much of the land between the Mississippi River and the east coast was covered with forest. These Indians, like the Indians of the other cultures depended on the natural resources around them for all of their basic needs. Because these Indians lived in the forests, they were called the Eastern Woodland Indians. Their food, shelter, clothing, weapons, and tools came from the forests around them. They lived in villages near a lake or stream. There were many diverse groups within the Eastern Woodland People. The most well known were the Iroquois, and the Cherokee nations.

San Miguel de Gualdape

1526 - 1609

San Miguel de Gualdape was the first European settlement inside what is now United States territory, founded by Spaniard Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón in 1526.[1] It was to last only three months of winter before being abandoned in early 1527.

Proprietary colony

1621

A proprietary colony was a colony in which one or more individuals, usually land owners, remaining subject to their parent state's sanctions, retained rights that are today regarded as the privilege of the state, and in all cases eventually became so

Royal colony

1700

A crown colony, or royal colony that was colonial admission of the english and later british empire,

Yemesee war

1715 - 1717

Conflict between the british settlers of colonial south carolina with many other indian tribes and more.

French and Indian war

1754 - 1763

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) is the American name for the North American theater of the Seven Years' War. The war was fought primarily between the colonies of British America and New France, with both sides supported by military units from their parent countries of Great Britain and France. In 1756, the war escalated from a regional affair into a world-wide conflict.

Anglo-Cherokee War

1758 - 1761

Sugar act

1764 - 1766

The Sugar Act, also known as the American Revenue Act or the American Duties Act, was a revenue-raising act passed by the Parliament of Great Britain on April 5, 1764.

Regulator movement

1765 - 1771

The War of the Regulation (or the Regulator Movement) was a North and South Carolina uprising, lasting from about 1765 to 1771, in which citizens took up arms against corrupt colonial officials. Though unsuccessful, some historians consider it a catalyst to the American Revolutionary War.

Stamp act

1765 - 1766

These printed materials were legal documents, magazines, newspapers and many other types of paper used throughout the colonies. Like previous taxes, the stamp tax had to be paid in valid British currency, not in colonial paper money.The purpose of the tax was to help pay for troops stationed in North America after the British victory in the Seven Years' War.

Tea act

1773 - 1861

The Tea Act was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain. Its principal overt objective was to reduce the massive surplus of tea held by the financially troubled British East India Company in its London warehouses and to help the struggling company survive.

Mercantillism

1800

Mercantilism is the economic doctrine that government control of foreign trade is of paramount importance for ensuring the military security of the country. In particular, it demands a positive balance of trade