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Only the upper class could vote.

1800 - 1832

In 1800, the right to vote was based on wealth (upper class only) and gender (male). Less that 3 adults out of every 100 could vote. Since then, there have been some significant changes to the voting regulations:

The middle class men were given the right to vote

1832 - 1867

1832 Reform Act. This extended the right to vote to certain leaseholders and householders in the middle class. 5 adults out of every 100 could vote.

The working class males in towns could vote

1867 - 1872

1867 Second Reform Act. Further extension of the voting regulations in counties and boroughs (towns). 13 adults out of every 100 could vote, but still based on wealth.

The ballot act of secret voting

1872 - 1884

1872 Secret Ballot Act. Introduced voting by secret ballot to ensure no voter was influenced by intimidation or bribery. Before the secret ballot was introduced, voter intimidation was commonplace.

The working class in the country were given the right to vote

1884 - 1918

Representation of the People Act. Any male in the town or country occupying land or property with an annual rateable value of £10 could vote. 24 adutls out of every 100 could vote.

Women over 30 could vote

1918 - 1928

Representation of the People Act. All males over the age of 21 were given the vote. And, thank to the suffragettes, women over 30 got the vote. Women could sit in the House of Commons as MPs. Now 75 adults out of every 100 could vote.

All women over 21 could vote

1928 - 1940

Representation of the People Act. Uniform voting rights were extended to all men and women over the age of 21. 99 adults out of every 100 could vote.