Think Aloud/Read Aloud

Events

Past

1862

In 1862, Tolstoy wrote of the first "rational and immutable" method of teaching reading. It consisted of the teacher reading as a mother would read with her child, and thus Tolstoy called it the "domestic method." Tolstoy predicated that "this method will always remain the best and only one for teaching people to read and read fluently".

Past

1900

As early as the 19th century people started to teach children reading through read-aloud.

Past

1908

Huey recognized the importance of parents reading aloud to children and wrote that "the secret of it all lies in the parents reading aloud to and with their children"

Past

1970

Unfortunately, these early recognitions about reading to children were largely ignored until the late 1970's and early 1980's when the academic community started to show a sustained interest in storyreading. Only then, storyreading at school and at home, and storytellers once again received recognition.

Present

2007

Children can listen on a higher language level than they can read, so reading aloud makes complex ideas more accessible and exposes children to vocabulary and language patterns that are not part of everyday speech. This, in turn, helps them understand the structure of books when they read independently.

Present

2008

The read aloud and think aloud allows teachers the opportunity to help students develop background knowledge and connect concepts so that all children can begin to clarify their thinking during their discussions with their peers and teacher.

Present

2010

Teachers are preparing for a read aloud by prereading and marking passages that require more time to think aloud and to invite student discussion.

Present

February 1, 2018

National Read-Aloud Day

Future

1/1/2025

Teachers will do read aloud/think aloud more in the classroom with technology.