The History of the Periodic Table of the Elements

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Carolus Linnaeus comes up with a new naming systems for organisms

1753

As a result, chemists sought the same logic with organizing the elements.

Antoine Laurent Lavoisier publishes "Traite Elementaire de chimie"

1789

In this publication, Lavoisier lists and described the chemical and physical properties of the thirty known elements of his time.

Titanium is isolated.

1791

Humphry Davy shows that elements are electrically attracted to each other.

1807

J.W. Dobereiner classified some elements into triads.

1829

Triads are groups of three elements that have similar chemical properties.

Group of chemists meet in Karl ruche, Germany.

September, 1860

This meeting was proposed to review the various scientific matters at the time.

John Alexander Newlands makes a list of the chemical elements known to him.

1864

These items were based on order from the smallest atomic mass to the largest atomic mass.

Newlands proposed the Law of Octaves to the Chemical Society.

1866

The law of octaves is Newlands' idea that every eighth had many of the same chemical and physical characteristics as the first in the series of eight. When presenting to the Chemical Society, he was merely laughed at.

Dmitry Mendeleev shows Chemical Society that the Law of Octaves was correct.

1869

Mendeleev publishes his own periodic table

1869

Just as Newlands had done, Mendeleev arranged the elements in increasing atomic mass. He also took Newlands' work a stem further, and put them in rows according to the way they reacted with other elements when mixed.

Lothar Meyer publishes publishes his version of periodic table.

1870

This publication clearly showed a relationship between the relative atomic volumes and wights of the elements, but it was overshadowed by Mendeleev, as Mendeleev publishes a similar version before Meyer.

Mendeleev predicts the existence of elements that would fill empty spots

1871

French Chemists discover eka-aluminum, name it Gallium.

1875

German chemists discover eka-silicon and name it germanium, after their country.

1886

William Ramsey discovers that Helium exists on earth.

1894

John William Strutt and William Ramsey discover Argon.

1894

William Ramsey discovered two more noble gases: Krypton and Xenon.

1898

Radon is discovered by Fredrich Dorn

1900

H.G.J. Moseley discovers some elements couldn't be arranged by atomic mass

1911

H.G.J. Moseley developes the concept of atomic number.

1913