Timeline of Richard Pierpoint's Life

Main

Born

1744

He was born in Bondu, Senegambia and was probably a member of the Fulani Tribe.

Captured

1760

He was caught at the age of 16. He was sent to the Gambia River with many other Africans and was forced onto a boat. The boat took him down river to Fort James where he was sold to Europeans as a slave.

Arrival

1761

After the nightmarish two month boat ride across the atlantic, he arrived. He was a husk of his former self and was malnourished. When he was offloaded, he was cleaned and fed so he would be presentable enough to be sold. Richard Pierpoint, a British soldier, bought him. When he was sold, his religion, language, and his entire culture was taken from him.

Soldier

1780

He enlisted with the British Army to earn his freedom by fighting Americans. He was part of Butler's rangers and practiced Guerrilla styled warfare to combat the continental army. He took down supply routes from the Hudson to the Kentucky Rivers.

Veteren

1784

He left the army at the age of 36. He disappeared for about 4 years. During this time he was more than likely working as a farmhand or labourer.

Land

1788

Because he was a veteran, he was granted a 200-acre piece of land near what is now present day St. Catherines, Ontario. He cleared the land and built his own home on it.

Property

1791

The land he cleared was officially declared his own property. He decided to sell the land because he did not want to work on a farm or work on clearing more of the land.

Petition

1794

Pierpoint and a number of other free Africans petitioned Governor John G. Simcoe to have the right to live near each other so they would be able to help each other out. This request was denied.

Wrongfully Dishonored

1806

He had his name taken off the list of United Empire Loyalists. He had fought for England and did not get recognized for his sacrifices.

War of 1812

1812

He enlisted at the age of 68 to fight for the British against the Americans. He was allowed to fight, but he was not allowed to lead.

Home

1821

He asked Lieutenant Governor Maitland on July 21, 1821 to go home. He was denied, but he was given land. He worked hard, cleared the land, and built a new house.

Death

1832

He died alone at the age of 90 in his own home.