Poughkeepsie Studio

Preservation

DAR purchases Clinton House

1900

Community members launch a fundraising campaign to save Glebe House from demo

1927 - 1929

Active players include: Dr. J Wilson Poucher (head of the Dutchess Historical Society), the Junior League, the Poughkeepsie Eagle-News, the Rotary Club, and the American Legion Luncheon Club.

Glebe House is purchased jointly by the Dutchess Historical Society, the Junior League and the City of Poughkeepsie

1929

The American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society obtains roadside markers for 40 sites in Dutchess County

1934

Including: 337 Main Street (home of James Kent), 224 Mill Street (site of home of Baltus Barents Van Kleeck), Glebe House, Poughkeepsie Courthouse, Nelson House, Fall Kill, Matthew Vassar House (today’s Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center), “the Dutchess County academy site on Cannon Street” (not sure what this is), shoreline roughly between Livingston and Prospect Streets.

Dutchess County Landmarks Association is created

1969

Springside is named a National Historic Landmark

1969

“Landmarks of Dutchess County, 1683-1867; Architecture Worth Saving in New York State” is published

1969

Union Street Historic District is added to the National Register

1971

Garfield Place becomes a locally designated historic district

1971

Garfield Place Historic District is added to the National Register

1971

Mill Street-North Clover Street is added to the National Register

1972

City passes zoning ordinance to add a new district to the city zoning map, R-1, HD, to represent historic districts.

1972

The ordinance also creates a Historic Districts Commission, precursor to the current commission, with the power to regulate these historic districts.

First city-wide historic inventory survey

1976 - 1977

Survey included photos of every building in the city

Academy Street becomes a locally designated historic district

1977

The city updates its zoning ordinance to create a Historic District and Landmarks Preservation Commission with the power to designate in addition to regulate.

1979

Clinton House becomes the first locally designated landmark

1980

This fact was newly discovered by Holly Wahlberg, and the property's status as a landmarked building seems to be completely forgotten

7 historic districts and the Springside site are added to the National Register

1982

These include: Academy Street Historic District, Balding Avenue Historic District, Main Mall Row, Market Street Row, South Hamilton Street Row, Springside Gatehouse, Upper Mill Street, and Vassar-Warner Row

Design Guidelines created for Main Street

1988

73 Mansion St: Cossum House is added to the local register

1997

3 properties are added to the local register

1999

Iccludes: 81 S Hamilton St, 4 Balding Avenue and 24 Balding

284 Main Street: Welles-Zimmerman Building is added to the local register

2002

62 Montgomery St.: Jacob Corlies House is added to the local register

2004

20 Springside Drive: Springside Porter’s Lodge is added to the local register

2005

Nelson House is added to the local register

2006

Changes to Preservation Ordinance sets up a 7 person commission (what was this a change from?) according to Poughkeepsie Journal article from 2007

2007

What was this a change from? This is according to Poughkeepsie Journal article

Hoffman House and Reynolds Homestead (83 N. Water Street) are added to the local register

2007

83 N. Water St.: Hoffman House and Reynolds Homestead are added to the local register

2007

284 Main Street: Welles-Zimmerman Building is demolished

2009

36 N. Clover St.: Pelton Mansion and Wheaton Park are added to the local register

2010

103 S. Hamilton St.: Corlies-Ritter-Hart House is added to the local register

2011

County condemns and demolishes Nelson House

2012

8 properties are added to the local register

2013

INcludes: 115 Hooker Avenue, 16 Davies Place, 20 Academy Street, 317 Main Street, 328 & 330 Main Street, 57 Montgomery Street, 83 Worrall Ave, 87 S Hamilton Street

16 Davies Place: Harloe House is added to the local register

2013

2 properties are added to the local register

2014

Clarence Lown Memorial Rock Garden at College Hill Park and the No. 8 School Building on Cannon Street

2 properties are added to the local register

2015

Soldier’s Fountain and 204 Church Street

4 properties are added to the local register

2016

Including: Corlies-Brinckerhoff-Rutherford House, Glebe House, Holy Comforter (11 Davies Place) and its rectory (18 Davies Place)

2 properties added to the local register

2017

College Hill Park was voted on 2/6 and 55 Noxon St is expected to go through this spring

Urban Planning

Settlement of Poughkeepsie

1683

Property Plotting

1697

Property Plotting and Dividing

Connection from Downtown to Riverfront Landing

Approx. 1770

Connection is made from Downtown settlement to riverfront for sloops to gain easy access to the downtown markets.

Matthew Vassar - Improvement Party

1830 - 1840

The Improvement Party (Matthew Vassar) - promoting creation of new industries, new streets, pavements and brick sidewalks, and private academies for young men and seminaries for young women (Flad)
Plan to make Delafield St (close to the Upper Landing) an avenue of handsome homes set back 50ft or more with lawns in the front.
Plan to make an elite residential square uptown

First Public School for poor children

1840

Poughkeepsie with mostly undeveloped land

1860

much of the area within Poughkeepsie City limits remained undeveloped (even on the river slope) (Flad)
THe Upper and Lower landings were somewhat separate clusters of business and residence connected with the main business area on the hilltop by a fringe of houses along Union and Mill Streets
Mill Street remained most fashionable address with its comfortable brownstones

Rents on the rise - construction increased

1867

competition for new hospital

James P. Kirkwood - water engineer hired to filter water from the Hudson

1870

Eastman elected mayor - municipal improvements

1871

Eastman elected mayor - implemented ambitious program of municipal improvements
bad problem with sick in Poughkeepsie
Eastman put city into debt to achieve state-of-the-art sewage and water systems

John Sutcliffe - water flow to houses/businesses

1872

John Sutcliffe constructed filters on land a mile north of the city line - water began to flow to houses and business in the city

National Economic Depression - overburdened municipality and in debt

1873

Telephone exchange in Poughkeepsie

1878

Electric street lighting

Approx. 1880

downtown becomes evening destination

Arbor Day declared official holiday in New York

1888

“treeless streets and barren commons would be transformed and beautiful, that unnattractive towns would be made attractive, and waste places would be redeemed.”

Removal of front yard fences - changing streetscapes

1889 - 1890

Edmund Platt wrote “ the movement for the removal of fences gathered headway and produced so great a change in the appearance of many residence streets that photographs taken before 1880s are almost unrecognizable now, even where the buildings remain almost as they were. Every house, not actually on the sidewalk line, formerly had its fence in front. Now very few fences remain except as dividing lines at the rear of lots.” (Flad)

College Hill Park transferred to the city

1892

William W. Smith purchased College Hill and transferred it to the city as a park.

Chicago Exposition

1893

Lucy Maynard Salmon attended - city beautiful ideas (Flad)

Street scapes less cluttered

1900 - 1910

After 1900 - electricty run underground/sewer and water under streets as well - streetscapes became less cluttered
Early 1900s - paving streets, aligning streets (paving of lower main sprouted more commercial/residential) (Flad)
Early 20th century - Municipal housekeeping - Lucy Maynard Salmon - history department at Vassar
communication through newspapers

Lucy Salmon pens letter urging civic improvement

1906

1906 - Salmon penned letter arguing that Poughkeepsie was far behind compared to other American cities and towns in forming organizations for civic improvement
fraternal societies, social/political clubs don’t do much help, poughkeepsie needs municipal leagues, civic clubs, city improvement societies, art leagues, city music commissions, civic art guilds, playground associations, tree planting societies, street cleaning leageues (Flad)

Firehouses built

1908 - 1909

Poughkeepsie's first playground

1911

Salmon brings in planner with expertise in landscaping

1915

Salmon believed in working with business and professional leaders wherever her planning and reform interests converged with theirs, as they did in improving the city’s appearance and its reputation as a healthy environment.

Lucy Salmon Community Services event

1916

community services by Lucy Salmon, being held Sunday afternoons in Poughkeepsie’s Cohen Theater - attracting three thousand people under one roof for consecutive sundays (Flad)

Market Street extended North as New Market

1917

Planning Exhibit - Poughkeepsie

1919

Poughkeepsie Chamber of Commerce reported it had secured the greatest city palnning exhibit in the United States - industrial expansion fund of $250,000 (Flad)
City’s mayor began seeking funds for bridge across the hudson

Myron West (Planner) presents his plan for Poughkeepsie

1924

Myron West presentation (well known planner from Chicago) (flad)
-West provided comprehensive zoning and street plan, including street corrections, evaluation of the location of transit, rail and water transportation, streets, schools, parks, and public buildings, and revitalization of its waterfront (never-ending concern for Poughkeepsie)

President Hoover's Standard Zoning Act

1924

25 businessmen and professionals (Mayor Appointed) review West's plan

1926

Mayor appointed a committee of twenty-five representative businessmen and professionals to review West’s plan, did not set up a planning commission though (Flad)

Planning Commission established

1928

Depression era efforts to revitalize

Approx. 1930 - Approx. 1940

1930s - Many local efforts in soil, water and forest conservation were undertaken by both public and private sectors. (Flad)

1930s - Major initiative to update the image of the two million businesses on the Main Streets of America (Flad)
1930 - Poughkeepsie Chamber of Commerce in its industrial survey of the city reported that the city had had comparatively few labor difficulties in recent years. (Flad)
Low cost of living in Poughkeepsie “enables the workers to maintain higher living standards than large industrial centers where wages are higher.”
1931 - Increase in hospital care paid for by the city’s Board of Public Welfare. (Flad)
1931 - City of Poughkeepsie reached its borrowing limit and had to announce a delay in paying old-age pension claims, ALSO Governor authorized $6 million for work relief under the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration (TERA)
1933 - CWA - Civil Works Administration as a temporary emergency job-creation project
Renovated Lincoln Center (city owned clubhouse for poor children), installed new gymnasium floor. College Hill Park received new storm sewers, 115 laborers made grounds improvements at Hudson River State Psychiatric Hospital
1935 - FHA offered loans to local business owners for remodeling, while the building industry instituted a nationwide competition sponsored by the Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company
1935 - New Deal inheritance tax (made it costly for owners of the great Hudson River estates to pass them along to their heirs
1936 - a traveling exhibition of modern storefronts sponsored by the Pittsburge Plate Glass Company

1937/38 - Poughkeepsie Post Office (Part of Depression Era Post office construction boom - Roosevelt) (Flad)
Modeled after the former Dutchess County Courthouse built in 1809
1937 - Ecological Survey (Vassar College Professor Edith Adelaide Roberts) on the botanical resources of Dutchess County (Flad)

Poughkeepsie Area Development Association - parking plan

1950

Poughkeepsie Area Development Association presented plan for increased downtown parking. (non-profit, nonpartisan, fact-finding organization devoted to the development of the Poughkeepsie area”
Traffic congestion harmed business (Chamber of Commerce quote) (Flad)

Purchase of Waryas park

1954

Mill-Catherine St Urban Renewal Project

1955

Poughkeepsie Plaza opens -

1958

Poughkeepsie Plaza opened - “Largest parking area between Westchester County and
Albany” with 1,450 parking spaces - anchors W.T. Grant, Woolworth’s, and Grand Union
1958 - 45% of the city’s total 13,000 housing units had been constructed prior to the 20th century (Flad)
“Although the charm and character of these older homes is an important aesthetic asset to the City, they represent problems in terms of maintenance and in compliance with today’s plumbing, electrical and fire regulatory standards.” - A consultant

General Development Plan - Candeub & Fleissig

1960

North-South Arterial Construction

1963 - 1966

Bulldozed through historic neighborhoods, and created barrier between river and downtown
“Livingston Woods” gone - where the violet greenhouses were
Cut into 228 parcels, including 178 dwellings housing 200 families, a loss of $600,000 in tax revenue (at the then-current rate)

CBD "Strongest Downtown area between Albany and White Plains"

1964

Poughkeepsie Urban Renewal Agency formed

1965

Five major project areas, ⅕ total area of the city, ⅓ of population for redevelopment, rehabilitation or demolition.

PURA demolishes first building for redevelopment (Riverview Project)

1966

Would eventually by 120 residential, 30 business and industrial sites (including Poughkeepsie Yacht Club, Pirate Canoe Club)

Poughkeepsie becomes "Model City"

1967

Model Cities Committee Strik

1967 - 1968

Model Cities committee strike about lack of public representation in planning

Master Plan Report #1 - Economic Survey and Plan

1967

June 1967

Beginning demolition for East-West arterial

1968

Plans for new City Hall

1969

Main Mall approved

1969

42 of Poughkeepsie’s civic leaders visited Kalamazoo and came back with approval for a main mall (Kalamazoo also had streets on either side of the mall)

600 homes included in improvement program

1970

600 homes were included in a neighborhood improvement program designed to bring existing structures up to code standards, improve street lighting, street resurfacing, and sidewalks

Kaal Rock Park created

Approx. 1970

Located under the span of the Mid-Hudson Bridge, and with only one means of access, it earned a reputation for drug dealing and fell into neglect

Focusing on development of lower main

1971

Lower main street characterized as a “critical area of derelict alcoholism” (Flad)
City focuses on redevelopment of lower main

People's Housing Development Corporation founded

1971

Main Mall Construction

1972 - 1974

State/Federal funds for public housing facilities

Approx. 1973 - Approx. 1977

Approximate date - mid 1970s

East-West Arterial Construction

1974 - 1979

Displaced 48 owners, 59 tenants, and 26 businesses (Josh)

Main Mall

1974 - 2001

Redevelopment of Riverfront Park (Waryas Park)

1974 - 1975

Committee to focus on Economic Revitalization of the CBD

1983

Mayor Aposporos and the Common Council teamed up with the Downtown Council merchants to appoint a committee to focus on economic revitalization of the central business distirct. (Flad)
Frustrated with the perception of the mall by the press

Waterfront Advisory Committee

1986

Waterfront Advisory Committee (with help of Matthew D. Rudikoff Associates) Local Waterfront Revitalization Program

Survey of 90 storefronts

1986

57% retail - including 13 food, 9 clothing, 5 stationary, 4 jewelry, 4 shoe and 3 photography
32% service - banks, lawyers, dentists and hair stylists
11% vacant - accounted for 13% of available square footage fronting on Main Street

Hyett-Palma, Inc plan

1987

Main Mall hired Hyett-Palma, Inc to submit “A Business Enhancement Plan for Downtown Poughkeepsie, NY” (Flad)
Hyett-Palma prepared a strategic plan in association with Retail Consultant Services and Real Estate Services Group that attempted to define marketing plan for the commercial district.

300 block east of hamilton open to traffic

1991

Poughkeepsie Partnership, a joint public-private nonprofit organization between the Chamber of Commerce, the Common Council and the mayor promoted project.
Suggested as a test to reopening Main Street altogether

New City Charter

1996

Storefront survey

1997

63% vacant
Of more than 40 retail shops in the ‘88 survey, only 14 remained in 1997
Total of 22 retail on the main mall

City of Poughkeepsie Comprehensive Plan

1998

Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan

1998

Social

Architecture

Dutch Colonial/Stone houses/Frame houses/Brick houses

1683 - 1785

Clinton House

1765

Glebe House

1767

Clinton House rebuilt

1783

Georgian/Federal/Greek Revival

1786 - 1839

Poughkeepsie Bank

1830

Grecian

City Hall

1831

post-Colonial design with a hint of Greek Revival Influence

Christ Church (Episcopal)

1833 - 1834

Gothic Revival

The Farmers and Manufacturers National bank

1834 - 1835

Grecian

Poughkeepsie Collegiate School

1835 - 1836

Parthenon-like form rose from College Hill, the highest point in the village, Poughkeepsie’s own Acropolis

Poughkeepsie Female Academy

1835 - 1836

Grecian

St. Paul's Episcopal Church

1835 - 1837

Dutchess County Academy

1836

Grecian

104 Academy Street

1840

Greek Revival

Dutchess County Surrogates Offices

1847

Grecian

Second Reformed Church

1849

Gothic Revival & Romanesque

Old Poughkeepsie Savings Bank

1911

Neoclassical

Transportation

River Era

1683 - 1850

Albany post road authorized

1703

Ferry Service began

1777

Main Street extended to river

1800

Hutson River Steam Boat Service

1808

First mid-hudson steamboat terminal

1814

Erie canal completed

1825

Whaling company established

1832

Hudson River Railroad extended to city

1850

Railroad Era

1850 - 1930

City street railway system began

1870

Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge Opens

1888

J.W. Hinkley's trolleys - Poughkeepsie City & Wappinger Falls Electric Railroad

1894

J. W. Hinkley’s trolleys, Poughkeepsie City & Wappingers Falls Electric Railroad, open, reshape the city, receive investment from City Council, all lines converging at Main & Market

Present railroad station built

1918

Highway Era

1930 - 2017

Mid-Hudson Bridge opened

1930

car fare $0.80

Taconic Parkway extended to Dutchess

1935

Trolley closes - replaced by buses

1935

Central Dutchess Rail Lines abandoned

1938

Ferry service ended

1941

NYS Thruway built west of River

1956

I-84 completed across southern Dutchess

1963

Route 9 north-south arterial completed

1966

Railroad bridge abandoned after fire

1974

east-west arterial system completed

1979

Passenger service began at Stewart Airport

1990

East block of main mail opened to traffic

1991

Metro-North parking expansion agreement

1995

Business/Industry

Martin Hoffman builds mill on Fall Kill

1755

Hoffman builds docks at mouth of Fall Kill for sloops

1756

Schenck's Landing serves as supply depot for Army

1776

Agriculture the main industry

1799

Vassar Brewery established

1801

James Vassar, fire 1811 killing his son John, son Matthew takes over, rebuilds 1812

George Oakley partners with Hoffmans at Upper Landing

1807

George Oakley arrives and partners with the Hoffmans at Upper Landing, builds new storehouse, adds new flour grinding machine to the grist mill

Grain mills, mill ponds along Fall Kill

1808

hotels & tourism

1815 - 1837

Steamboats → hotels & tourism - Exchange House (1834 - “at foot of Main Street”); Eastern House (purchased 1831, corner of Main and Catherine Streets); Northern Hotel (corner of Mill and Washington Streets)

Lottery Industry

Approx. 1820 - Approx. 1830

1820s - lottery industry, George Oakley’s Temple of Fortune on corner of Main and Liberty

Dyewoods Factory at Upper Landing

1825

Whaling Industry

1832 - Approx. 1845

1832-mid 1840s - whaling industry: Poughkeepsie Whaling Company (f. 1832 Matthew Vassar shareholder) and the Dutchess Whaling Company (f. 1833, George Oakley treasurer, later acquired other company, whaling dock near Fall Kill)

College Hill School

1836

College Hill School / Collegiate School, created by Improvement Party

Matthew Vassar - Larger Riverfront Brewery

1836

Agricultural Exposition in Poughkeepsie

1844

Businessmen raise money to bring Hudson River Line into Poughkeepsie

1847

new Reynolds Warehouse at Upper Landing

1849

Poughkeepsie Gas Company Established

1851

Reynolds builds steamship "Reliance"

1854

Poughkeepsie Daily Eagle (Newspaper)

1860 - 1915

Vassar College founded

1861

Luckey, Platt & Co consolidates storefronts 336-346 Main

1865 - 1875

Eastman Business College

1865

Harvey Eastman, penmanship, banking, stock trading,

Collingwood Opera House - Now Bardavon - built

1869

Lumber and coal baron James Collingwood builds Collingwood Opera House, now the bardavon

Banking and retail flourish on Main - City expansion

Approx. 1870 - Approx. 1880

new brick Reynolds Warehouse near train station (brick)

1872

Poughkeepsie Transportation company relocation

1879

Poughkeepsie Transportation Company relocates from Upper Landing to Main Street Landing (Middle Landing), marking end of shipping from UL

Arnold Chair Company strike

1879

Poughkeepsie Glass Corporation

1880

outside investors open Poughkeepsie Glass Corporation at site of former whaling dock, remain until mid 20th c

Gifford, Sherman & Innes Dyewoods Factory bankruptcy

1884

Poughkeepsie Light and Power Company established

1885

De Laval Separator Company

1892

De Laval Separator Company of Sweden builds factory for milking machinery at Lower Landing, major employer through to mid 20th C

Elting Building built = clothing store, later Whalen Drug

1892

W.W. Smith (Smith Bros Cough Drops) donates park

1893

W. W. Smith of Smith Brothers Cough Drops buys the College Hill site and bequeaths it to the city as a park

Power Station at Upper Landing

1894

Poughkeepsie Electric Light & Power Company builds power station at UL
Turn of C - streets macadamized, street lighting, changes catering to automobile, water, sewer, telephone wires all put underground

Adriance Public Library

1898

Luckey, Platt & Co - new beaux artes department stores

1901

Central Hudson Gas and Electric Company established

1901

Poughkeepsie Underwear Company

1902

Poughkeepsie Underwear Company opens in an 1870s building that previously made shoes and overalls

Gifford, Sherman & Innis Dyewoods Company closes

1905

one of last remaining businesses at Upper Landing / Fall Kill, torn down

Poughkeepsie Trust Co

1906

YMCA

1909

Poughkeepsie Savings Bank

1911

Gas Manufacturing Plan - Central Hudson Gas & Electric Co

1911

Amrita Club

1912

IBM plant built off of I-84

1963

DeLaval Plant relocated from city to town

1964

NYS economic development zone created

1994

History

Hudson River’s discovery

1609

Poughkeepsie becomes Dutchess County Seat

1734

Poughkeepsie = New York State Capital

1788

Village of Poughkeepsie Incorporated

1799

Village of Poughkeepsie becomes City of Poughkeepsie

1854