History of Periodic Table

Events

Hennig Brand-Phosphorus

1669

Attempted to created a Philosopher’s Stone He heated residues from boiled urine, and a liquid dropped out and burst into flames

Julius Scaliger -Platinum

1735

Henry Cavendish-Hydrogen

1766

Hydrogen was observed and collected long before it was recognised as a unique gas by Robert Boyle in 1671, who dissolved iron in diluted hydrochloric acid.

Antoine Lavoisier - Carbon

1769

it was first recognized as an element in the second half of the 18th century.

Rutherford - Nitrogen

1772

Joseph Priestly - Oxygen

1774

Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier

1789

first modern textbook about chemistry. It contained a list of "simple substances" that Lavoisier believed could not be broken down further, which included oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, phosphorus, mercury, zinc and sulfur, which formed the basis for the modern list of elements

Sir Humphrey Davy - Magnesium

1808

47 elements discovered

1809

Scientists began to see patterns in the characteristics.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner

1817

formulating one of the earliest attempts to classify the elements.

Alexandre Béguyer de Chancourtois

1862

vis tellurique' (telluric screw), a three-dimensional arrangement of the elements constituting an early form of the periodic classification

John Newlands

1863

56 elements into 11 groups, based on characteristics.

Meyer

1864

produced several Periodic Tables. His first table contained just 28 elements, organised by how many other atoms they can combine with. Unfortunately for Meyer, his work wasn’t published until 1870, a year after Mendeleev’s periodic table had been published. He was the first person to recognise the periodic trends in the properties of elements, and the graph shows the pattern he saw in the atomic volume of an element plotted against its atomic weight.

Dimitri Mendeleev

1869

Discovery started the development of the periodic table, arranging chemical elements by atomic mass. He did so by writing the properties of the elements on pieces of card and arranging and rearranging them until he realised that, by putting them in order of increasing atomic weight, certain types of element regularly occurred. He predicted the discovery of other elements, and left spaces open in his periodic table for them.

Ernest Rutherford

1886

three types of radiation; alpha, beta and gamma rays

Antoine Bequerel - radioactivity

1886

Marie and Pierre Curie - radium and polonium

1886

Sir William Ramsay and Lord Rayleigh

1894

Noble gases added to the periodic table as group 0.

J. J. Thomson - electrons

1897

Rutherford and Hans Geiger

1911

electrons orbit the nucleus of an atom

Bohr

1913

electrons move around a nucleus in discrete energy called orbitals. Radiation is emitted during movement from one orbital to another.

Rutherford

1914

identified protons in the atomic nucleus.

Henry Moseley

1914

provided atomic numbers, based on the number of electrons in an atom, rather than based on atomic mass.

James Chadwick

1932

first discovered neutrons, and isotopes were identified, this was the complete basis for the periodic table

Cockroft and Walton

1932

first split an atom by bombarding lithium in a particle accelerator, changing it to two helium nuclei.

Glenn Seaborg

1945

identified lanthanides and actinides (atomic number >92), which are usually placed below the periodic table.