Development of the Models of Human Occupation

Events

1st edition of the Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application

6 February 1985 - 4 June 1985

A critical analysis of the MOHO (Haglund, 1999)

1 April 1999 - 1 August 1999

Questions asked
"Is the MOHO consistent with the values and beliefs of occupational therapy?"
"Does the MOHO support the intervention process in occupational therapy?"

"Is the MOHO consistent and applicable to the current regulations and societal values (in Swedan)?

MOHO most widly used among therapists (NBCOT, 2004)

1 April 2004 - 17 August 2004

MOHO: Theory and Application 4th edition

1 January 2008 - 6 May 2008

Narratives as data gathering tools - a tool for interpretive use in clinical
reasoning (O'Brien, 2009)
Therapeutic reasoning table
Importance of use of valid and reliable data collection instruments, for both clinical intervention and research (O'Brien, 2009)
Emphasis of the documentation and communication (O'Brien, 2009)
Similarities and differences between MOHO & ICF

National survey of therapists

3 July 2008 - 30 December 2008

MOHO as a model developemnt

General System Theory (Bertalanffy, 1936)

1 January 1936 - 1 May 1936

Reilly's Occupational Behaviour Model

1 January 1977 - 1 May 1977

MOHO - open system

1 January 1980 - 1 May 1980

Kielhofner, Burke & Reilly present model in AJOT
Developed out of the occupational behavior tradition, with three (3) hierarchical positioned subsystems (volition, habituation, occupational performance)

MOHO - dynamic system theory

1 January 1995 - 1 May 1995

he core of the MOHO: (a) Human systems are dynamic organizations of mind and matter; (b) Occupational behaviour is dynamically assembled, and (c) Human systems self-organize through occupational behaviour. Subsystems have lost hierarchical emphasise and were defined as heterarchic (complementary functions to the operation of the whole system) (Kielhofner, 1995, p. 34)

Development of the model components content and their relations

Volition as the need to explore and master environment (Haglund, 1999)

1 January 1980 - 1 May 1980

Volition reflected the individual's need to explore and master the environment and contained such internal images as personal causation, values, and interests

Three (3) hierarchical positioned subsystems

1 January 1980 - 1 May 1980

Volition as the highest form governed the overall operation of the system and was responsible for choosing and initiating occupational behavior. The habituation subsystem was a midlevel subsystem that organized the individual's occupational behaviour into patterns and routines. Volition and habituation, together, gave substance to the actions produced by the lowest subsystem, performance. (Haglund, 1999)

Habituation - roles and habits (Haglund, 1999)

2 January 1980 - 1 May 1980

Performance consists of perceptual-motor, process, and communication and interaction

3 January 1980 - 1 May 1980

Heterarchical relations of three (3) subsystems (Kielhofner, 1995, p. 34)

1 January 1995 - 1 May 1995

Heterarchy emphasizes that the three subsystems each contribute different but complementary functions to the operation of the whole system.
Volition represents an organization of dispositions and self-knowledge built on earlier experiences

Volition - an organization of dispositions and self-knowledge (Haglund, 1999)

2 January 1995 - 2 May 1995

Volition represents an organization of dispositions and self-knowledge built on earlier experiences

Mind-brain-body performance subsystem (Kielhofner, 1995, p. 83)

3 January 1995 - 3 May 1995

Habituation - role scripts and habit maps (Haglund, 1999)

3 January 1995 - 1 May 1995