UK Timeline

Events

Britain

6000 BC - Present

Following the end of the last Ice Age, around 10,000 years ago, the levels of the North Sea began to rise as waters formerly locked up in great ice sheets melted. Sometime after about 8200 BC the last dry 'land bridge' from Lincolnshire and East Anglia to Holland was taken over by salt marsh. By 6000 BC even the marshes had largely gone, drowned by the sea. -Paul-

Farming was introduced to U.K

4500 BC - 3500 BC

Before circa 4500 BC, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic (Early and Middle Stone Age) people were nomads, hunting and gathering wild plants. In the middle of the fifth millennium BC, a new way of life, based on farming plants and animals, was introduced from the continent. The replacement of hunting and gathering was gradual and wasn't completed until the latter part of the third millennium BC in Britain. Once farming was established, communities began to settle down. Made from Zander F.

Carpentry and coppice woodworking is developed

4500 BC - 2500 BC

The hollowing out of trees for log-boats began in the Mesolithic (Middle Stone Age), but carpentry (using large structural timbers for building) was a Neolithic (Late Stone Age) innovation. Coppicing is the regular cutting back of a tree or shrub to stimulate the rapid growth of shoots. The polished flint axe was the main tool used. Large trees were felled with axes and split into planks. Smaller rods and poles, cut from coppiced hazel, alder and willow, were woven to make fences and hurdles. by alisa

Flint and stone begins to be mined from underground

4500 BC - 2000 BC

Axes made from polished flint and stone were important throughout the Neolithic (Late Stone Age) and Early Bronze Age. Fine-grained stone was quarried from hillsides in Cumbria, Wales, Cornwall and Northern Ireland. Mined flint is of better quality than surface flint. Mines are known in Northern Ireland, Scotland and East Anglia, but the majority of flint mines were on the chalk hills of southern England, with underground galleries following the seams of flint reached by shafts up to 15m deep. by alisa

U.K builds settlements

4500 BC - 3000 BC

There are fewer earlier Neolithic (Late Stone Age) settlements in England and Wales - which may reflect a more mobile lifestyle among early farmers in these areas - than in Scotland and Ireland. Most earlier Neolithic settlements in Britain were of about one to three houses with possibly a few outbuildings. They were rarely defended, except in Cornwall. Most settlements were placed at some distance from areas of barrows. Made from Zander F.

Increasingly sophisticated stone tools are made using new polishing techniques

4500 BC - 2500 BC

Throughout the Stone Age (Palaeolithic to Neolithic), stone tools were fashioned by chipping or 'knapping'. This involved the removal of flakes using either a hammer stone or a 'soft hammer' of bone or antler. In the Neolithic, axes and knives were first roughed-out by knapping, but were then polished using abrasive sand and water, or a shaped 'polissoir' (rubbing stone). This time-consuming process produced a more durable cutting edge that could easily be sharpened. a alisa

Simple pottery begins to be made

4500 BC - 3500 BC

The manufacture of pottery requires the control of high temperatures and is an important early technological development. Pottery arrived in Britain with the first farmers. Early pottery vessels were generally undecorated with heavy rims and rounded bases. From about 3500 BC the upper parts of some pottery vessels were decorated with patterns made while the clay was still soft. Pottery is important to archaeologists because it is very durable, surviving in the soil for thousands of years. by alisa

Building was introduced to U.K

4500 BC - 3500 BC

Before circa 4500 BC, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic (Early and Middle Stone Age) people were nomads, hunting and gathering wild plants. In the middle of the fifth millennium BC, a new way of life, based on farming plants and animals, was introduced from the continent. The replacement of hunting and gathering was gradual and wasn't completed until the latter part of the third millennium BC in Britain. Once farming was established, communities began to settle down. Made from Zander F.

First industrial-scale copper mines are dug

1800 BC - 1500 BC

Shortly after 2000 BC the first deep copper mines were dug. Two of the best known are at Mount Gabriel in County Cork, Ireland, and Great Orme, north Wales. Another major area of prehistoric mining was in mid-Wales. Most Bronze Age mines went out of use in the Iron Age. The scale of metal production was truly industrial. Mount Gabriel is thought to have produced about 370 tonnes of copper and Great Orme 175 to 235 tonnes. by alisa

Major lowland valleys are extensively settled

1500 BC - 800 BC

The scale of later Bronze Age settlement was poorly understood until about 1970, when it became possible to differentiate pottery of the period from that of the Iron Age. This coincided with increased aerial survey data and excavation ahead of commercial development. Current knowledge suggests that this was the period when the major lowland river valleys were extensively settled. by alisa

U.K Makes weapons

1500 BC - 1200 BC

In the Middle Bronze Age (1500-1200 BC) smaller forms of axes (palstaves) began to appear alongside the first 'socketed' spearheads (attached to the shaft by a hole in the base). Thrusting weapons (dirks, rapiers) appeared, as well as elaborate bronze pins and bracelets. Made from Zander F.

More sophisticated metal weapons and ornamentation appear

1500 BC - 1200 BC

In the Middle Bronze Age (1500-1200 BC) smaller forms of axes (palstaves) began to appear alongside the first 'socketed' spearheads (attached to the shaft by a hole in the base). Thrusting weapons (dirks, rapiers) appeared, as well as elaborate bronze pins and bracelets. by alisa

Celtic culture and tribal kingdoms start to emerge

1200 BC - 800 BC

Changes in religion, ceremonial and burial practices imply social change. The new structure persisted through the Iron Age and has been labelled as 'Celtic'. It seems probable that the later Bronze Age controlling elites comprised a larger proportion of society and may have been centred upon a 'warrior aristocracy'. This is the period when the numerous tribes of Britain began to combine into the larger groupings that became the named tribal kingdoms of the Iron Age. Made from Zander F.

Production of metal objects increases and diversifies rapidly

1200 BC - 800 BC

In the Late Bronze Age (1200-800 BC) both forms and quantities of metalwork increased rapidly. Major innovations were smaller 'socketed' axes (attached to the shaft through a hole) and swords with leaf-shaped blades intended for slashing. by alisa

Celtic culture and tribal kingdoms start to emerge

1200 BC - 800 BC

Changes in religion, ceremonial and burial practices imply social change. The new structure persisted through the Iron Age and has been labelled as 'Celtic'. It seems probable that the later Bronze Age controlling elites comprised a larger proportion of society and may have been centred upon a 'warrior aristocracy'. This is the period when the numerous tribes of Britain began to combine into the larger groupings that became the named tribal kingdoms of the Iron Age. Made from Zander F.

Hill forts are made in U.K

800 BC - 700 BC

Originating in the later Bronze Age (1000 BC - 800 BC), the hill forts of the early Iron Age are found over a wide area of the British Isles: in Scotland (Finavon Fort in Angus), Wales (The Brieddin and Moel y Gaer in Powys) and England (Grimthorpe in Yorkshire, Ivinghoe Beacon in Buckinghamshire and Bathampton Down in Somerset). Many seem to have been used infrequently and may have been seasonal meeting places and food stores rather than permanently inhabited settlements. Made from Zander F.

First hill forts are constructed

800 BC - 700 BC

Originating in the later Bronze Age (1000 BC - 800 BC), the hill forts of the early Iron Age are found over a wide area of the British Isles: in Scotland (Finavon Fort in Angus), Wales (The Brieddin and Moel y Gaer in Powys) and England (Grimthorpe in Yorkshire, Ivinghoe Beacon in Buckinghamshire and Bathampton Down in Somerset). Many seem to have been used infrequently and may have been seasonal meeting places and food stores rather than permanently inhabited settlements. by alisa

First Hill forts are constructed

800 BC - 700 BC

oliver

Noelithic and Bronze AGes

800 BC - 600 BC

Oliver

Celts

750 BC - 12 BC

From around 750 BC to 12 BC, the Celts were the most powerful people in central and northern Europe. There were many groups (tribes) of Celts, speaking a vaguely common language.The word Celt comes from the Greek word, Keltoi, which means barbarians and is properly pronounced as "Kelt".The Celts lived across most of Europe during the Iron Age. Several hundred years before Julius Caesar, they occupied many parts of central and western Europe, especially what are now Austria, Switzerland, southern France and Spain. Over several years, in wave after wave, they spread outwards, taking over France and Belgium, and crossing to Britain. -Paul-

Ironwork in U.K

700 BC - 500 BC

Iron objects dating from the sixth or even seventh century BC are known from England, Scotland and Wales, but the widespread adoption of iron only became common during the fourth century BC. The skill of Iron Age blacksmiths is demonstrated by the range of tools and weapons recovered from the excavation of sites such as Danebury in Hampshire and Llyn Cerig Bach on Anglesey, North Wales. These include saws, chisels and other carpentry tools very similar in form to modern ones. Made from Zander F.

Ironworking technology becomes widespread

700 BC - 500 BC

Iron objects dating from the sixth or even seventh century BC are known from England, Scotland and Wales, but the widespread adoption of iron only became common during the fourth century BC. The skill of Iron Age blacksmiths is demonstrated by the range of tools and weapons recovered from the excavation of sites such as Danebury in Hampshire and Llyn Cerig Bach on Anglesey, North Wales. These include saws, chisels and other carpentry tools very similar in form to modern ones. by alisa

cunobelinus becomes king of the catuvellauni tribe

9 AD - 40 AD

Cunobelinus (William Shakespeare’s 'Cymbeline'), ruled the Catuvellauni for about 30 years and conquered a huge territory. His name appears on coins issued at Colchester and St Albans and he is described by the Roman historian Suetonius as 'Britannorum rex' - king of the Britons. His core territory was Hertfordshire, but he eventually controlled much of East Anglia and the south east. by alisa

Roman

43 AD - 410 AD

The Romans lived in Rome, a city in the centre of the country of Italy. The Romans invaded other countries. The Roman Empire covered much of Europe, north Africa, and the Middle East. -Paul-

Paul 'the Chain' leads a military commission to suppress opposition in Britain

43 AD - 410

After the defeat of the usurper Magnentius, the emperor Constantius II sent Paul 'the Chain' (so called for his repressive practices and habit of binding his prisoners in heavy chains) to investigate and purge Magnentius' supporters in Britain. Among the victims was Martinus, 'vicarius' (governor) of the diocese of Britain, who committed suicide rather than face trial. By Jared

Vikings destroy Dumbarton, stronghold of the British kings of Strathclyde

410 - 1066

Dumbarton, 'the fortress of the Britons', also known as Alcluith or Clyde Rock, was at the centre of the kingdom of Strathclyde, in northern Britain. It was captured by Viking forces under Ivarr the Boneless and Olaf the White. They took booty and captives, including the king of Strathclyde, back with them to Dublin, their capital in Ireland. By Lydia

Saxons

450 AD - Present

With the breakdown of Rome's control of Britain it became possible for the Angles, Saxons and Jutes from across the North Sea who had been raiding the coast of Britain for a hundred years to increase their pressure. Instead of raiding and then withdrawing, by about 450 A.D they were beginning to settle here. The invasion consisted of a series of attacks on different parts of the country over a period of years and under a number of leaders. -Paul-

Christian King

616 - 627

Æthelberht was one of the most powerful kings in England around 600 AD, although by the time he died he was losing dominance to Redwald, king of the East Angles. One of his lasting legacies was his law code, the first written in English. Made from Zander F.

Vikings

816 - 1016

The Viking Age in Britain began about 1,200 years ago in the 9th Century AD and lasted for just over 200 years. About the year 800, bands of fierce raiders began to attack our coasts. They were the Vikings (also called the Danes although they didn't just come from Denmark. ) -Paul-

New king in U.K

1087 - 1088

William Rufus, second son of William the Conqueror, left his father a day or two before he died. He had to move swiftly if he was to lay claim to the crown of England, to which he had not been specifically named as heir. Having arrived in England, he met with Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury, who performed William's coronation at Westminster Abbey. Made from Zander F.

henry I defeats and captures his brother, robert of Normandy

1106 - 1110

William the Conqueror had divided his lands between two of his sons, with Normandy going to Robert and England to William Rufus (William II). On William II's death, the third son, Henry, took the English throne. Robert had unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow him by invading in 1101, but in 1106 Henry turned the tables by defeating his brother at the Battle of Tinchebray, in Normandy. Robert was kept in captivity until his death in 1134. Thus Henry reunited his father's dominions. by alisa

First 'eisteddfod' is held at Aberteifi in Cardigan

1176 - 1189

Lord Rhys ap Gruffyd held a winter court at which contests were held between top entertainers of the period. The winner of the 'eisteddfod', or 'session', was to be seated in the bardic chair. Bards, poets, harpists and other music makers engaged in contests in pursuit of the seat of honour. by alisa

Barbados comes under British control

1603 - 1714

Captain John Powell landed in Barbados in 1625 and claimed the island as a British Caribbean colony. He returned two years later with a group of settlers and Barbados was developed into a sugar plantation economy using at first indentured servants and then slaves captured in West Africa. By Lydia

Women's Social and Political Union is formed to campaign for women's suffrage

Oct 1897 - Oct 1899

The Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded by six women, of whom Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst soon became the most prominent. Frustrated at the lack of progress on women's rights, their activities soon became more confrontational, and included prison hunger strikes.

WWO (World War One)

1901 - 1918

There was the mystery of Titanic also happen between WWO. It was a lot shorter than WWT (World War Two) but war is still bad. Adolf Hitler was not leading the army but working in army as a soldier. -Paul-

WWT (World War Two)

1928 - 1945

It was a cruel and violence war after WWO (World War One). Every christion was dead and Anne Frank wrote a book that explains us what happen in the war. Adolf Hitler killed himself as he was losing in the war. Japan, who didn't give up,

they did not give up until USA dropped a nuclear bomb in two different places.
-By Paul-

1,000 people are killed in the Belfast Blitz

1941 - 1942

No city, save London, suffered more loss of life in one night raid than Belfast, after 180 German bombers attacked the city. At the height of the raid an appeal was sent to the Irish leader Éamon De Valera, who sent fire engines to help fight the fires raging in the city. by alisa

Modern Britain

1945 - 2016

Britain was also a founder member of North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) in 1949, and sent a contingent of troops to take part in the Korean War (1950 - 1953) against Communist North Korea. -Paul-

The Cold War

1947 - 1991

It was a war that brought the world to near destruction. By Jared

Conservatives under Harold Macmillan win the general election

1959 - 1963

In a massive personal triumph for Harold Macmillan, the Conservatives won by 365 seats (and 49.3% of the vote) to 258 for Labour. The Conservative campaign slogan 'you've never had it so good' reflected the growing affluence of the electorate. by alisa

Britain joins the US in strikes

07 October 2001

British forces contributed to the initial US military strikes against the Islamic fundamentalist Taleban regime in Afghanistan - the first retaliation to the terrorist attacks of '9/11'. The Taleban, who had allowed the terrorist organisation al-Qaeda to use Afghanistan as a base, was overthrown and replaced with a US-backed administration. Coalition forces, including British troops, remain in Afghanistan. Osama Bin Laden, the al-Qaeda leader responsible for the '9/11' attacks, was not found.

Britain joins the U.S in an invasion of Iraq

2003 - 2004

Despite significant opposition at home, the British government gave military support to the controversial United States-led invasion of Iraq. Crucially, the action was not backed by a United Nations mandate, sparking debate over the legality of the invasion. Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was overthrown and captured. Iraq now has a democratically elected government, but the country remains deeply unstable as a result of the deliberate stoking of sectarian tensions by terrorist groups. Made from Zander F.

Suicide bombers kill 52 people on London's transport system

2005

Three men blew themselves up on London Underground trains, while a fourth exploded his bomb on a double-decker bus. Fifty two people were killed and more than 700 injured. On 21 July there were four more attempted suicide bombings in London, but none of the devices exploded. Islamic terrorist organisation Al-Qaeda claimed responsibility, but it is thought that the bombers, all British Muslims, acted alone. Made from Zander F.