Federalism Timeline

Events

Dual Federalism Era

1789 - 1901

The period from 1789 to 1901 has been termed the era of Dual Federalism. It has been characterized as a era during which there was little collaboration between the national and state governments.

The marshall Court Era

1801 - July 6, 1835

John Marshall was the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1801–1835) whose court opinions helped lay the basis for American constitutional law.

McCulloch v. Maryland

1819

was a landmark decision by the Supreme Court of the United States. The state of Maryland had attempted to impede operation of a branch of the Second Bank of the United States by imposing a tax on all notes of banks not chartered in Maryland.

Gibbons v. Ogden

1824

was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the power to regulate interstate commerce, granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution, encompassed the power to regulate navigation. The case was argued by some of America's most admired and capable attorneys at the time. Exiled Irish patriot Thomas Addis Emmet and Thomas J. Oakley argued for Ogden, while U.S. Attorney General William Wirt and Daniel Webster argued for Gibbons.

Roger B Taney

1836

Roger Brooke Taney (/ˈtɔːni/; March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, holding that office from 1836 until his death in 1864.

Dred Scott V. Sanford

1857

also known simply as the Dred Scott case, was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on US labor law and constitutional law that held that "a negro, whose ancestors were imported into [the U.S.], and sold as slaves", whether enslaved or free, could not be an American citizen and therefore had no standing to sue in federal court,and that the federal government had no power to regulate slavery in the federal territories acquired after the creation of the United States. Dred Scott, an enslaved man of "the negro African race" who had been taken by his owners to free states and territories, attempted to sue for his freedom. In a 7–2 decision written by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, the court denied Scott's request. The decision was only the second time that the Supreme Court had ruled an Act of Congress to be unconstitutional.

Thirteenth Amendment

January 31, 1865

abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

Fourteenth Amendment

July 9, 1868

This amendment granted citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States.

Fifteenth Amendment

1870

the United States Constitution prohibits the federal and state governments from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude."

Interstate Commerce Act

February 4, 1887

is a United States federal law that was designed to regulate the railroad industry, particularly its monopolistic practices. The Act required that railroad rates be "reasonable and just," but did not empower the government to fix specific rates.

Sherman Anti-trust Act

July 2, 1890

The Sherman Anti-Trust Act was the first Federal act that outlawed monopolistic business practices. The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 was the first measure passed by the U.S. Congress to prohibit trusts.

Plessy V. Ferguson

May 18, 1896

was a landmark constitutional law case of the US Supreme Court. It upheld state racial segregation laws for public facilities under the doctrine of "separate but equal." The decision was handed down by a vote of 7 to 1 with the majority opinion written by Justice Henry Billings Brown and the dissent written by Justice John Marshall Harlan.

Sixteenth Amendment

February 3, 1913

to the United States Constitution allows the Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census.

Seventeenth Amendment

April 8, 1913

o the United States Constitution established the popular election of United States Senators by the people of the states. The amendment supersedes Article I, §3, Clauses 1 and 2 of the Constitution, under which senators were elected by state legislatures.

Cooperative Federalism Era

1930 - 1970

is a concept of federalism in which national, state, and local governments interact cooperatively and collectively to solve common problems, rather than making policies separately but more or less equally (such as the dual federalism of the 19th century United States) or clashing over a policy in a system dominated by the national government.

The New Deal

1933 - 1936

was a series of social liberal programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later. They included both laws passed by Congress as well as presidential executive orders during the first term (1933–1937) of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

LBJ's Great Society Begins and Grants increase

1964 - 1965

was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice

Ronald Regan is elected and calls for "New Federalism"

January 25, 1981 - 1989

Rehnquist Court

1986 - 2005

refers to the Supreme Court of the United States from 1986 to 2005, when William Rehnquist served as Chief Justice of the United States. Elected by State

No child Left Behind

01/02/2001

which passed Congress with overwhelming bipartisan support in 2001 and was signed into law by President George W. Bush on Jan. 8, 2002, is the name for the most recent update to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.Apr 10, 2015

Patriot Act

October 26, 2001

This was an Act of Congress that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. With its ten-letter abbreviation (USA PATRIOT) expanded, the full title is "Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001".

Roberts Court

2005 - 2016

refers to the Supreme Court of the United States since 2005, under the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts. appointed by bush, he's was a swing vote