Curriculum Mapping

Events

Orientation

8/29/2016 - 9/3/2016

Scuba/Kayak

9/4/2016 - 9/11/2016

Academic Week 1

9/12/16 - 9/18/16

Academic Week 2

9/19/16 - 9/25/16

Academic Week 3

9/26/16 - 10/2/16

Academic Week 4

10/3/16 - 10/9/16

Academic Week 5

10/10/16 - 10/16/16

Expedition Rotations

10/17/16 - 11/6/16

Academic Week 7

11/7/16 - 11/13/16

Parents Week/Weekend

11/14/16 - 11/20/16

Academic Week 8

11/21/16 - 11/27/16

Final Week+

11/28/16 - 12/7/16

Research

Skills:
- Application of knowledge to address real-world issues
- Writing scientific literature
- Presenting findings
- Interpersonal communication and coordination of individual efforts into a group activity
- Developing proposals for future research

Background and Study Design

September 12, 2016 - October 14, 2016
  • Analysis of technical, scientific literature
  • Identification of a problem or question in need of research
  • Prediction of an outcome based on a specific, testable hypothesis
  • Designing a study to address a prediction

Data Collection and Analysis

September 14, 2016 - October 31, 2016
  • Application of methodology
  • Execution of data collection and recording
  • Analysis of trends in data using statistical tools
  • Data organziation and use of graphical tools

Communication of Results

November 7, 2016 - December 2, 2016
  • Presentation of complex topics to a wide variety of audiences
  • Drafting and revising scientific literature
  • Composition of collaborative reports

Math

Skills:
- Identify appropriate ways to solve problems
- Communicate mathematical ideas through models, writing, and speaking
- Analyze scientific data and systems through a mathematical lens

Intro Unit

September 3, 2016 - September 10, 2016
  • Understand that math at The Island School is about applying math to better understand the world
  • Understand and be able to apply the basic problem solving method

Water Unit

September 13, 2016 - September 28, 2016
  • Articulate the challenges of obtaining fresh water in The Bahamas
  • Describe the methods by which freshwater is obtained on Eleuthera
  • Analyze the cistern system on The Island School Campus by
    • calculate how certain amounts of rainfall correspond to rises in cistern levels
    • calculate "user-friendly" information for the community based on daily measurements through the use of spreadsheets
    • Critically analyze data collected over time, assessing which data is trustworthy
    • Using descriptive (visual and non-visual) statistics to represent trends
    • Modeling available water on campus

Research Statistics Unit

9/28/16 - 10/16/16
  • Use descriptive (visual and non-visual) statistics to represent both trends between groups and trends over time
  • Use inferential statistics, such as confidence intervals, T-tests, ANOVAs and linear regression to draw conclusions about populations
  • Determine the best methods to analyze a given hypothesis

Population Unit

10/17/16 - 11/6/16
  • Understand randomization and bias in study design
  • Describe some basic demographic information about Eleuthera and The Bahamas
  • Make generalizations about a population using descriptive and inferential statistics
  • Describe the factors that affect population growth and decline
  • Algebraically manipulate exponential function models for populations in order to make predictions about population size and time
  • Graph – and interpret graphs of – populations over time

Energy Unit

11/8/16 - 11/27/16
  • Describe ways in which energy is produced and consumed on Eleuthera and on campus
  • Describe the difference between energy and power
  • Perform calculations that demonstrate an understanding of the difference between watt and watt-hours
  • Identify and calculate the costs and benefits of different energy systems

Carrying Capacity Unit

11/28/16 - 12/1/16
  • Understand the concept of carrying capacity on a local and global scale
  • Recognize and quantify the resources that affect carrying capacity
  • Identify impacts of carrying capacity in population growth models

Art

Skills:
- Familiarity and facility with environmental art terms and vocabulary
- Using art as a tool and visual langauge for: self-expression, establishing a sense of place, and for effecting change
- Documentation and discussion of ephemeral art through phtography and/or writing
- Exploring and understanding a variety of traditional and non-traditional art mediums and materials

New Perspectives

August 29, 2016 - November 11, 2016

Using the entire semester as a reference, students were tasked with choosing a new subject that they feel passionately about that pertains to their Island School experience, and express it visually in any medium they want. Students were encouraged to take creative risks for this over-arching assignment, and to perhaps try a medium that they hadn't had experience with up to this point.

Personal Adventure Photo Story

September 1, 2016 - September 13, 2016

Students documented a personal adventure that they have had in the first 15 days of school. They showed this experience through 3 to 6 photos, accompanied by captions, the elements and principles of art/design they utilized, and a written reflection.

Site Specific Sculpture

September 14, 2016 - September 30, 2016

Students studied the pioneering environmental artists, with emphasis on Andy Goldsworthy. The culmination of this unit was in groups of 2 or 3, students created their very own land-based art pieces, that could be ephemeral in nature. They used natural elements, and a natural outdoor setting in which to create their works. On September 30th each group presented their SSS's in a class-critique setting. They were encouraged to show their piece through photos, video, or stop-motion/time lapse. A few groups chose to physically take the entire class to their piece.

Juxtaposition Photgraphy Project

September 30, 2016 - October 10, 2016

Again using photographic techniques, and elements and principles of art and design, students individually compiled three photographs that exemplify juxtaposition of human impact found in the natural world. Students studied environmental photographers such as Edward Burtynsky, Chris Jordan, and Alejandro Duran to deepen their knowledge on this topic. Along with their photographs, students submitted an artist statement that illustrated their intentions and processes.

Scientific Illustration EQ

October 10, 2016 - November 4, 2016

Students were taught the techniques of both watercolour painting, and inking. They then used these techniques to illustrate either a head, torso, or tail portion of an aquatic creature of their choice (organism has to be native to Eleutheran waters). These creature portions were then combined with pre-assigned group members' pieces, making up the EQ (Exquisite Corpse) area of the the project. Students could then broaden their piece by making a wood-transfer version of it on casuarina.

Fencespiration

November 21, 2016 - December 2, 2016

Having roughly a 60 foot segment of fence to work with in the farm, students created their very own decorated fence posts that acted to beautify, and inspire passersby with inspirational messages, tips, or paintings. The fenceposts were then protected with varnish to ensure that they would stand the test of time. This was the fall 2016 students' legacy project for art.

Histories

Skills:
- Practice and be more comfortable with ethnographic fieldwork
- Develop and hone interview techniques
- Identify lens, bias, and perspective
- Empathizing with a variety of perspectives
- Synthesize multiple sources to create coherent narratives
- Critically self-reflect on how they create, interpret, and synthesize stories

Peer Interview

August 31, 2016 - September 5, 2016

Students are asked to begin to hone their interview skills. This assignment is due before students are taught how to interview properly. The hopes is to have students identify the challenges and success that come with the interview process.

Staff Interview

September 9, 2016 - September 16, 2016

Students are tasked with continuing to develop their interview skills by interviewing a staff member. Their goal is to focus on the semi-structured interview method and begin learning about their new home.

Worldview Reflection Paper

September 12, 2016 - October 7, 2016

Students begin to explore “the lens through which they see world”. This assignment forces students to begin to acknowledge their implicit biases and how that affects the way they interpret history.

Mini-Ethnography Project

September 14, 2016 - September 30, 2016

This assignment is the key stone project of the first Unit. Students spend 3 consecutive weekends in a local settlement gathering information about the place. It fits into the pillar of developing a sense of place. Students are tasked with asking a question that will shed light on the history of the settlement and the greater Bahamas (Overarching theme: How the micro sheds light on the macro). The final project is a short video where students explore their findings.

This I Believe on Race

September 28, 2016 - October 14, 2016

This assignment asks students to explore their own beliefs on race. Like the Worldview paper, this is an introspective piece. Based off of NPR’s this I believe… The piece is an audio essay.

Tourism and Development

October 17, 2016 - November 20, 2016
  • Introductory level understanding of neo-colonialsm
  • Theory behind Paradise is Plantation (neo-colonialism in The Bahamas)
  • Students have their own opinion on how tourism shapes a place drawing from information from a variety of sources (readings, interviews, Harkness discussions, etc.)
  • Students can define and discuss responsible tourism (along with different types of tourism... sustainable tourism, voluntourism, adventure tourism, ecotourism, etc.)
  • Students should be able to conduct interviews with an array of people and glean valuable information from the interview

Literature

Skills:
- Take personal ownership of learning
- Collaborate in order to critically analyze complicated texts and draw inter-textual connections
- Read and write in order to cultivate sense of place and engage in personal reflection
- Intentional communication and active, engaged listening
- Draw connections between multiple texts and contemporary Caribbean life
- Cultivate identity as a writer through developing skill and voice

Writers Workshop: Non-fiction

September 10, 2016 - September 24, 2016
  • developing personal writing voice
  • strengthening understanding of ethos/pathos/logos
  • understanding rhetorical situation

Literary Circles: Kei Miller

September 13, 2016 - September 23, 2016
  • tying literature to place
  • defining culture through literature
  • how do we interpret history through literature

Literary Circles: Omeros

September 27, 2016 - October 14, 2016
  • tying literature to place
  • defining culture through literature
  • how do we interpret history through literature

Writers Workshop: Creative

October 1, 2016 - October 8, 2016
  • developing personal writing voice
  • strengthening understanding of ethos/pathos/logos
  • understanding rhetorical situation

Tourism and Development

October 17, 2016 - November 13, 2016
  • Introductory level understanding of neo-colonialsm
  • Theory behind Paradise is Plantation (neo-colonialism in The Bahamas)
  • Students have their own opinion on how tourism shapes a place drawing from information from a variety of sources (readings, interviews, Harkness discussions, etc.)
  • Students can define and discuss responsible tourism (along with different types of tourism... sustainable tourism, voluntourism, adventure tourism, ecotourism, etc.)
  • Students should be able to conduct interviews with an array of people and glean valuable information from the interview

Power, Passion, Voice

November 8, 2016 - November 30, 2016
  • Finding a passion and voice
  • Communicate passion with conviction to effectively share and inspire

Marine Ecology

Skills:
- Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language
- Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation
- Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems
- Recognizing the ecological niche of marine species
- Associating marine threats to marine ecology
- Critical self-reflection of one's role within and responsibility to the global ecosystem
- Utilizing SCUBA and snorkel to promote ocean inquiry

Intro Class

August 29, 2016 - September 3, 2016

Concepts of ecology./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language./ Critical self-reflection of one’s role within and responsibility to the global ecosystem.

Primary Production and Coral

September 12, 2016 - September 16, 2016

Concepts: Interdependent dynamics of marine ecosystems, Biodiversity, Local and global threats to marine ecosystems, Marine ecosystem structure, function and development
Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language./ Associating marine threats to marine ecology.

Diversity and Invertebrates

September 19, 2016 - September 23, 2016

Concepts: Interdependent dynamics of marine ecosystems, Biodiversity, Local and global threats to marine ecosystems, Marine ecosystem structure, function and development
Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language./ Associating marine threats to marine ecology./ Critical self-reflection of one’s role within and responsibility to the global ecosystem.

Adaptation and Fish

September 26, 2016 - September 30, 2016

Concepts: · Species adaptation, Marine ecosystem structure, function and development
Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language.

Ecosystem Services and Mangroves

October 3, 2016 - October 7, 2016

Concepts: Ecosystem services, Economic evaluation, Interdependent dynamics of marine, ecosystems, Local and global threats to marine ecosystems, Marine ecosystem structure, function and development
Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language./ Associating marine threats to marine ecology.

Holistic Dive

October 10, 2016 - October 14, 2016

Concepts:Marine ecosystem structure, function and development
Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation./ Recognizing the principles and importance of science and scientific language.

Natural History Project

November 7, 2016 - November 30, 2016

Skills: Observing and identifying structures and functions of marine ecosystems./ Exploring naturalist writing as a tool for conservation.

Seminar

Skills:
- Meaning making through reflection
- Project management, goal setting, and tracking
- Integrity-driven collaboration
- Cross-cultural understanding and communication
- Community service through partnership
- Visual story-telling
- Investing constituents through crisp communication
- Drawing connections between interdisciplinary studies

Apprenticeships

September 6, 2016 - November 25, 2016
  • Cross-cultural understanding and communication
  • Community service through partnership
  • Understanding of our campus systems and the hard work and grit necessary to keep them going

Storytelling and Film

September 6, 2016 - December 1, 2016
  • Understand how we get people to care about a story and what makes a good story
  • Practice film skills including: interviewing, shooting, editing
  • Make a documentary film pitch
  • Edit final documentaries into a quality product that examines how we live better in a place

Biography Documentary

9/15/2016 - 9/24/2016

Capturing Moments

9/27/16 - 10/7/16

Interviews and Audio

10/10/16 - 10/15/16

Cultural Bridge

October 11, 2016 - October 28, 2016
  • Gain a deeper understanding of the beauty, perspectives, and challenges of The Bahamas
  • Understand One Eleuthera's impact on the community
  • Contribute to the South Eleutheran community

Final Apprenticeship Documentary

10/20/16 - 11/30/16

Community

3-Day Kayak

September 4, 2016 - September 9, 2016
  • Build community: get off campus and get to know each other more deeply
  • Make Island School feel like home
  • Model an Island School expedition: students should understand what makes a safe, functional, and productive expedition

Midterm DOL

October 5, 2016 - October 13, 2016
  • Reflect on their reasons for coming to The Island School and how they've begun to change while here
  • Gain ownership of their educational experience at The Island School
  • Reflect on and critique their role in the semester community
  • Establish goals for themselves in the community during the second half of the semester

9-Day Expedition

October 17, 2016 - November 5, 2016
  • Think more deeply about leadership
  • Experience a leadership position and learn through trial and error
  • Gain camping and cooking skills and become comfortable with an on the water expedition
  • Get a break from academics
  • Form strong relationships with other group members

Final DOL

November 23, 2016 - December 5, 2016
  • Reflect thoughtfully on their experience at The Island School as well as their role in their own education
  • Gain ownership of their educational experience at The Island School
  • Reflect on and critique their role in the semester community
  • Consider their experience reintegrating in their home environment and communities.