Transatlantic Evangelicalism during 1500-2000

Important events, persons and periods as described in the literature.

Main

End of Renaissance

1500

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance

The expression "early modern" is sometimes incorrectly used as a substitute for the term Renaissance. However, "Renaissance" is properly used in relation to a diverse series of cultural developments that occurred over several hundred years in many different parts of Europe — especially central and northern Italy — and it spans the transition from late medieval civilization to the opening of the early modern period. In the visual arts and architecture, the term 'early modern' is not a common designation as the Renaissance period is clearly distinct from what came later. Only in the study of literature is the early modern period a standard designation. European music of the period is generally divided between Renaissance and Baroque. Similarly, philosophy is divided between Renaissance philosophy and the Enlightenment.

Age of Enlightenment

1637 - 1804

There is little consensus on when to date the start of the age of Enlightenment and some scholars simply use the beginning of the 18th century or the middle of the 18th century as a default date.[7] If taken back to the mid-17th century, the Enlightenment would trace its origins to Descartes' Discourse on the Method, published in 1637. Others define the Enlightenment as beginning in Britain's Glorious Revolution of 1688 or with the publication of Isaac Newton's Principia Mathematica which first appeared in 1687. As to its end, some scholars use the French Revolution of 1789 or the beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1804–15) as a convenient point in time with which to date the end of the Enlightenment.[8]

Age of Classical Modernity

1789 - 1900

According to one of Marshall Berman's books (Berman 1983,[page needed]), modernity is periodized into three conventional phases (dubbed "Early," "Classical," and "Late," respectively, by Peter Osborne (1992, 25):

* Early modernity: 1500-1789 (or 1453-1789 in traditional historiography)
* Classical modernity: 1789-1900 (corresponding to the Long nineteenth century (1789–1914) in Hobsbawm's scheme)
* Late modernity: 1900-1989

Some authors, such as Lyotard and Baudrillard, believe that modernity ended in the mid or late twentieth century and thus have defined a period subsequent to modernity, namely Postmodernity (1930s/1950s/1990s–present). Other theorists, however, consider the period from the late 20th century to present to be merely another phase of modernity; this phase is called "Liquid" modernity by Bauman or "High" modernity by Giddens (see: Descriptions of postmodernity).

French Revolution 1789-1799

1789 - 1799

1859 On the Origin of Species

1859

Age of Late Modernity

1900 - 1989

According to one of Marshall Berman's books (Berman 1983,[page needed]), modernity is periodized into three conventional phases (dubbed "Early," "Classical," and "Late," respectively, by Peter Osborne (1992, 25):

* Early modernity: 1500-1789 (or 1453-1789 in traditional historiography)
* Classical modernity: 1789-1900 (corresponding to the Long nineteenth century (1789–1914) in Hobsbawm's scheme)
* Late modernity: 1900-1989

Some authors, such as Lyotard and Baudrillard, believe that modernity ended in the mid or late twentieth century and thus have defined a period subsequent to modernity, namely Postmodernity (1930s/1950s/1990s–present). Other theorists, however, consider the period from the late 20th century to present to be merely another phase of modernity; this phase is called "Liquid" modernity by Bauman or "High" modernity by Giddens (see: Descriptions of postmodernity).

Now

Current

Now!

Continental

Evangelicalism in the Continental Europe

Martin Luther 1483-1546

1483 - 1546

Huldrych Zwingli 1484-1531

1484 - 1531

John Calvin 1509-1564

1509 - 1564

95 Theses in Wittenberg 1517

1517

1530 Augsburg Confession

1530

1537 Smalcald Articles

1537

1580 Book of Concord

1580

Philipp Jakob Spener 1635-1705

1635 - 1705

August Hermann Francke 1663–1727

1663 - 1727

1675 Pia Desideria

1675

N.L. von Zinzendorf 1700-1760

1700 - 1760

British

Evangelicalism in British Islands

John Knox 1510-1572

1510 - 1572

1646 Westminster Confession of Faith

1646

John Wesley 1703-1791

1703 - 1791

George Whitefield 1714-1770

1714 - 1770

1795 London Missionary Society

1795

Charles Spurgeon 1834-1892

1834 - 1892

Keswick Conventions started 1875

1875

USA

Evangelicalism in USA

Charles Finney 1792-1875

1792 - 1875

D.L. Moody 1837-1899

1837 - 1899

Carl F. Henry 1913-2003

1903 - 2003

Billy Graham 1918-...

1918 - Present

1947 The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism

1947